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These 3 COVID-19 vaccine side effects are common, CDC expert says

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These 3 COVID-19 vaccine side effects are common, CDC expert says

An expert with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recently shared three common side effects of the COVID-19 vaccine.

“People do have mild reactions to the vaccines. Especially after the second dose, so people should be prepared to have pain, potentially fatigue, and a low-grade fever,” Amanda Cohn, MD, CAPT, USPHS, a member of the CDC’s National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases, said late last week.

But, she noted, these side effects are “expected and should resolve after one or two days.”

“It’s not COVID,” she continued. “It’s your body building an immune response to the protein that is mimicking the disease.”

Indeed: The two coronavirus vaccines that have gained emergency approval in the US — one developed by Pfizer-BioNTech and the other by Moderna — may cause side effects after they’re administered, such as pain and swelling at the injection site, and/or fever, chills and headache, the CDC says.

Since vaccination initiatives began, many patients have reported experiencing so-called “COVID arm” after receiving the jab, while others hoping to avoid any unpleasant side effects have been warned not to take over-the-counter pain relievers beforehand, as experts are concerned that doing so could impact the vaccines’ effectiveness. 

The nation’s top infectious disease expert, Dr. Anthony Fauci, has warned of side effects, saying in January that he was “knocked out” for about a day after receiving the second dose of the Moderna vaccine. 

But not everyone who received the vaccine will experience side effects — and that doesn’t mean the jab wasn’t effective, experts previously told Fox News.

“When it comes to vaccines (COVID-19 and others), the phrase, ‘No pain, no gain’ does not apply. Studies do not support the idea that if you have a mild reaction or no reaction, you are less protected. The immune system is incredibly complex and everyone will react differently and for different reasons,” Dr. Shira Doron, an infectious disease physician and hospital epidemiologist at Tufts Medical Center, told Fox News. 

“Overall, younger people tend to react more vigorously, women have more local reactions (but not more generalized reactions), and the reactions after the second dose are more prominent than after the first,” she added. “But your experience may be quite different.”

Dr. Richard Ellison, meanwhile, said those who do not have any reactions following vaccination may just be “luckier.” 

“Having symptoms means that your body is reacting to the vaccine, but people can also have a very good antibody response without symptoms. They are just luckier,” said Ellison, an epidemiologist at UMass Memorial Medical Center. “It is also more common to have a reaction after the second dose, which is very typical after two-dose vaccines.”

For those who do experience vaccine side effects, the CDC advises placing a clean, cool, wet washcloth over the injection site should one experience pain, while also recommending to “use or exercise your arm” to reduce any discomfort. The federal agency also advises to “drink plenty of fluids” and “dress lightly” in the case of a fever. 

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Museums are safest indoor activity, study finds

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Museums are safest indoor activity, study finds

For people fatigued with quarantine amid the COVID-19 pandemic, a new study from Germany recommends what to do after getting out of the house.

Don’t go out to eat or get a haircut, don’t go shopping for food or go to the gym —  go to a museum.

According to the Berlin Institute of Technology (TU Berlin) in Germany, the risk of COVID-19 infection via aerosol particles is far lower in museums than in supermarkets, restaurants, offices and on public transportation.

Variables considered were the quality of the airflow, the type of activity carried out in the space, and the dose of aerosol particles inhaled by people in a room.

“What is clear from the study is that it is above all the situations in which we like to be that are unfavorable,” said Martin Kriegel, who helped lead the study. “Situations in which many people come together in a confined space: there you can not ventilate sufficiently, it will always be an unfavorable situation.”

Outdoor activities all increased last year in the face of canceled indoor events and cautions about the dangers of catching the virus while around other people inside.

The study said food shopping, dining indoors or exercising in a gym are at least twice as risky as visiting a museum to view art.

Museums, however, haven’t been considered essential to the populace.

Celeste DeWald, the executive director of the California Association of Museums, told the New York Times earlier this month: “It’s frustrating to see crowded shopping malls and retail spaces and airports, yet museums are completely closed and many have not been able to reopen at all for the last 10 months. […] There is a unique impact on museums.”

Critics think museum closure is a political matter.

In a column for the Los Angeles Times, art critic Carolina A. Miranda called California Gov. Gavin Newsom’s policies “absurd.” Museums in the Golden State remain closed to visitors.

“The wildly uneven criteria speak more to the powerful, well-funded lobbies helping shape public health policy than to anything resembling science or even common sense,” Miranda wrote. “At a moment in which it is possible to get a tattoo or paw the goods at Chanel in Beverly Hills, it should be possible to visit a museum. Period.”

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New version of first-ever African-American screen kiss discovered in Norway

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New version of first-ever African-American screen kiss discovered in Norway

A new version of the first known on-screen kiss between two African-American actors has been discovered in the collections of the National Library of Norway.

The 1898 film, directed by US film industry pioneer William Selig, stars vaudeville actors Saint Suttle and Gertie Brown and shows them courting and kissing in front of a cloth backdrop.

The only previously known copy of ‘Something Good – Negro Kiss’ was acquired from a collector in Louisiana in 2017 and added to the US Library of Congress’ National Film Registry in 2018 for its cultural value.

It depicts a tender scene between two African-American actors at a time when caricatures of Black life were more common.

The version identified by Norway’s National Library differs in that it is longer and the actors are filmed from a greater distance.

“It is more complex, there is more of a prelude before the kisses, with wooing, refusal and negotiation,” said Eirik Frisvold Hanssen, head of the National Library of Norway’s film section.

It was taken to Norway by a young Norwegian man, who likely bought a copy at the time in the United States and brought it back home, the National Library said. It is among the oldest films in the library’s collections.

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German police carry out dozens of dawn raids on far right crime network

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German police carry out dozens of dawn raids on far right crime network

BERLIN – Hundreds of police in Germany carried out dawn raids on 27 homes and business premises on Friday, including a lawyer’s office, in an operation targeting members of far right groups suspected of drugs and weapons trafficking, public broadcaster MDR said.

Prosecutors told the broadcaster that eight people, aged from 24 to 55, had so far been arrested in the raids which were carried out by 500 police officers. The suspects were members of the neo-Nazi groups Turonen and Garde 20, MDR said.

Authorities said the two gangs have for years been kingpins in the drugs trade in the eastern state of Thuringia, running a network that distributed crystal meth and weapons.

The offices of a lawyer in the central state of Hesse were also raided.

MDR said that its own investigations had revealed that the raids were the result of two years of tapping and bugging operations by security services.

The Turonen and Garde 20 are recognizable by their wearing of black clothes with far right nationalist insignia on them. They have become major players in the promotion of far right heavy metal concerts, at which neo-Nazi bands from Germany and other countries perform.

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