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The Mandalorian Season 2 Episode 7 Explained

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After the tragic events of last week’s episode saw the separation of our favorite clan of two, it was only fitting that the Mandalorian (Pedro Pascal) would come back fighting. And in “Chapter 15: The Believer,” our eponymous bounty hunter showed he was more than willing to put himself—his whole self—on the line for The Child.

The episode opens at the Karthon Chop Fields, where a droid is looking for Inmate 34667, a.k.a. Migs Mayfield (Bill Burr). He’s serving time for his involvement in the mission to rescue prisoner Qin from Bothan-Five, a New Republic Correctional Transport, but Marshall Cara Dune (Gina Carano) has other plans. She takes Mayfield into her custody so he can aid Mando, Fennec Shand (Ming-Na Wen), and Boba Fett (Temuera Morrison) in their search for Moff Gideon (Giancarlo Esposito), who managed to steal our baby Grogu away in “The Tragedy.”

As a former Imperial officer, Mando is betting on Mayfield remembering all his protocols to gain access to the Imperial terminal and locate Gideon’s coordinates. Hoping he might get something sweet out of the deal, Mayfield suggests they head to the planet Morak, where a secret Imperial mining hub can be found. This Suicide Squad of sorts heads there in Fett’s ship (RIP Razor Crest), and Mayfield is given sharp new garms to wear instead of his prison clothes. Sure was lucky the deadly bounty hunter had a circle scarf onboard to complete Mayfield’s combat look!

Upon landing in the tropical climes of Morak, the gang has to work out who’s going with Mayfield to the refinery, where the Imperial terminal is located. But the security protocols involve genetic signatures that would cause problems for the outlaws and Dune, who’s breaking more than a few rules to save the kid.

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Super dad Mando volunteers; as he’s never revealed his face, he’s not on any systems that could recognize him. Though he’s not keen on removing his helmet for the crew, that problem is swiftly solved once they commandeer an Imperial Combat Assault Transport carrying rhydonium, a volatile and explosive substance. Mando steals one of the defeated stormtrooper’s uniforms and a helmet, and he and Mayfield set off to the refinery.

Thus begins the Vietnam War-movie vibes of the episode, with Burr delivering the energy of a disillusioned vet who uses humor to mask the dark despair and post-traumatic stress of what he’s seen in combat. “Invaders in their land is all we are,” he tells Mando before pointing out the inconsistencies of the Mandalorian code: Is it that Mandalorians are not allowed to take off their helmets, or that Mandalorians are not meant to show their face? Fair point.

“I’m a realist, I’m a survivor just like you,” Mayfield continues. “Your rules change the more desperate you get. Everyone has the lines they don’t cross until it gets messy.”

This existential conversation is short-lived, as alien pirates soon try to blow up the transport. Mando engages in an impressive show of combat zeal without the protection of his Beskar armor, and after some ass-kicking and blasting, he kills the attackers and secures their safe arrival at the refinery. As the only Transport to return intact, the pair are cheered. “Glory of the empire,” the stormtroopers shout, which is certainly a new one for Mando. Still, they don’t have time to waste, and head to the mess hall so Mayfield can access the Imperial terminal.

Alas, yet another obstacle: Mayfield spots his former commander Valin Hess (Richard Brake) and refuses to go in. Mando, of course, is not aborting the mission. “I’ll lose the kid forever,” he says, a reminder of exactly what’s at stake. So Mando goes in and couldn’t look more suspicious, but hey, the guy’s knackered after single-handedly taking out five gangs of pirates.

Hess is keeping a beady eye on him, so when the terminal starts bleeping because the bounty hunter’s helmet is preventing the facial image from rendering, Hess’s attention is rapt. But just as the security protocol really makes a noise, Mando does it. He takes his off his helmet and reveals the most beautiful dad in the Star Wars universe.

Nice to see you, Djin Djardin.

Mando gets the coordinates, but Hess is on his feet and in the interrogating mood. Luckily, Mayfield finally puts on his big-boy boots and jumps to the bounty hunter’s side to cover. He pretends Mando, now fondly known as Brown Eyes, isn’t altogether there because of an accident. This convinces Hess, and after confirming the two were the same Transport Officers to survive the pirates, Hess demands they get a celebratory drink together.

Here’s where it gets dark and Mayfield’s witty facade falters. Faced with his former commanding officer toasting the Empire, Mayfield reminds him of Operation: Cinder on Burnin Konn. Hess had given the order to destroy the entire city, including a division of five to ten thousand men who left behind families and loved ones. Hess is dismissive about the loss of life, and a frustrated Mayfield asks if it was necessary to kill his fellow soldiers and civilians—people fighting for their freedom. Hess laughs and says, “we’ve outlasted them,” before excitedly sharing his plans to wreak even more havoc on the New Republic with the rhydonium: He’s sure it’ll cause the people to pine for Imperial control once more. “Everybody thinks they want freedom but what they really want is order,” Hess says.

the mandalorian

Disney

Mayfield’s resolve fails and he shoots his former commander in the chest. Alerting the rest of the Imperial forces to their subterfuge, he and Mando have to make an escape out of high windows overlooking a steep drop. Fennec and Cara have their backs with some sharp shooting, while Boba pulls up in Slave I to pick them up. Looking back on the refinery, Mayfield proves his worth, taking aim at some rhydonium and blowing the entire facility up.

This cathartic moment for the former soldier of the Empire impresses Marshal Dune. When the team reunites, she suggests Inmate 34667 died in the explosion, and Mayfield heads off to freedom, circle scarf and all. Then we have the most epic, heart-squeezing moment of all, as Moff Gideon receives a message from our Mandalorian, helmet-wearing hero: “Moff Gideon, you have something I want,” he declares, quoting bacl the antagonist’s words from “Chapter 7: The Reckoning.” “You may think you have some idea of what you’re in possession of, but you do not. Soon, he will be back with me. He means more to me than you will ever know.”

It’s clear Mando is the titular Believer, putting aside the Mandalorian traditions he inherited in favor of the beliefs he’s acquired since meeting our lil’ green friend. Grogu has taught Djin Djardin a new way, with a code of principles that recognizes one cannot simply ignore the battle between good and evil. Mayfield comes to this conclusion too, hence why he goes AWOL from the Empire. Both prove that sometimes, beliefs have to change to save lives and loved ones. The increasingly powerful bond between the Mandalorian, the Child, and the clan of misfits who’ve supported them along the way is something we can all believe in. This is the Way.

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Hilary Duff Bundles Up in A Pretty Pink Tweed Coat

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Hilary Duff is in New York City right now, filming her TV Land show, Younger. She was photographed in a cozy-looking pink tweed coat with a hot-pink blouse and pussy bow underneath.

Jose Perez/Bauer-GriffinGetty Images

celebrity sightings in new york   january 22, 2021

Jose Perez/Bauer-GriffinGetty Images

Duff is expecting her third child and her second with her husband, Matthew Koma. In an Instagram post on October 24, she posted a video on her of Koma rubbing her stomach on her Instagram story. “We are growing!!! Mostly me…,” she wrote. She and Koma, who married in late 2019, share a daughter, Banks Violet, who was born in October 2018.

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Duff also has an 8-year-old son, Luca Cruz, with her ex-husband, Mike Comrie.

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This past week, Duff shared on Instagram that she is seven months pregnant:
“Worked till midnightWoke up took Banks to gymnasticsHoused an empanada….and a 1/2 OK. …BACK to work.Repeat.Still hanging on to some fashion 7 months pregnant. love you @zara for these stretch pants. Anyone tried that PISTACHIOOOOO drink @Starbucks. Heavy on my mind rn…. I got a lot more thoughts right now but these were the important ones.”

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In December, Duff shared another update with her fans—this time about her long-beloved Disney Channel character, Lizzie McGuire. Initially, a reboot of the early aughts show had been in the works, but after show-runner Terri Minksy left the project, it was up in the air.

“I’ve been so honored to have the character of Lizzie in my life,” Duff wrote in December, confirming the project was officially off. “She has made such a lasting impact on many, including myself. To see the fans’ loyalty and love for her, to this day, means so much to me. I know the efforts and conversations have been everywhere trying to make a reboot work but, sadly & despite everyone’s best efforts, it isn’t going to happen.”

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Who Are Wanda and Vision’s Twins, Billy and Tommy, in WandaVision?

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At the end of Wanda Maximoff’s so-fast-it-makes-my-heart-palpitate pregnancy in WandaVision, she gives birth to twin boys named Billy and Tommy. By the looks of it, they’re about 2-3 months old when they’re born. That could be because Hollywood almost never makes newborns actually look like newborns. Alternatively, it could be a sign of Wanda’s sitcom-verse reality moving so quickly it begins to crumble around her. We just don’t know!

Here’s what we do know: The Marvel Cinematic Universe is bringing Billy and Tommy into the fray for a reason. They’re well-known, well-liked characters in the Marvel comics, and their existence in the MCU opens up enormous questions about the future of the franchise. Before we start speculating, here’s what’s important to understand about the Maximoff kiddos.

Billy and Tommy have superpowers.

Marvel Studios/Disney+

Like their mother and father, Billy and Tommy have superhuman skills, which could make raising them in the “normal” suburb of Westview a challenge. (It’s safe to guess that will factor into the Brady Bunch-esque humor of the next few episodes.) In the comics, Billy Maximoff has reality-warping abilities à la his mother, Scarlet Witch, while Tommy can run as fast as his deceased uncle Pietro. Notably, neither of them seem to share any abilities with their father, Vision.

Which makes us wonder if…

They might’ve been crafted from shards of a demon’s soul.

Concerning, I know!

So far, the MCU hasn’t dipped its toe too deep into the mythological components of the Marvel comics universe, apart from its Thor- and Loki-centric storyline. But Marvel has long loved creating larger-than-life villains that take the form of demons, gods, and goddesses (and cosmic entities that like to eat planets whole). So it’s not a stretch to think WandaVision might shepherd in some new, more otherworldly villains. Which brings us to the demonic Mephisto.

Many fans believe Mephisto will be WandaVision’s ultimate big bad. In the comics, Wanda is so desperate to have children with her android husband Vision that she creates a false pregnancy, then uses her magic to conjure her two twins into existence. What she doesn’t learn until later is that she pulled Billy and Tommy’s souls from shards of Mephisto’s soul, imbuing them with something evil. When Mephisto comes to reclaim those soul shards, the twins disappear, effectively “dying” and sending Wanda spiraling into grief.

I’d be surprised if WandaVision follows this exact arc: A) because it’s predictable and B) because it’s extremely dark—but it would be the perfect opportunity to reveal Mephisto’s clutching the show’s strings.

We might see a different version of them in the upcoming MCU films.

What makes Billy and Tommy’s appearance in WandaVision so earth-shattering is not necessarily how they’ll affect the show itself (though those implications could be huge). It’s how they could impact all the upcoming MCU films.

You see, in the comics, Billy and Tommy are reincarnated as Billy Kaplan and Tommy Shepherd, two super-teens who eventually go by Wiccan and Speed. At the time, they don’t know they’re brothers, and they don’t understand their connection to Scarlet Witch and Vision. Eventually, Billy fits the pieces together: When he starts telling people he’s Scarlet Witch’s reincarnated son, they sort of imply he’s a crazy super-fan and urge him to, er, stop being a weirdo. But Billy—ever a darling—persists, and eventually it’s revealed he’s telling the truth: Billy and Tommy have, indeed, returned from beyond the grave!

At this point, Billy and Tommy are leading members of the Young Avengers. Billy is one of the first gay characters in the Marvel universe, deeply in love with his team member Teddy Altman, aka the shape-shifting Hulkling. We know from previous casting announcements that other Young Avengers are headed to the MCU screen: Hailee Steinfeld will play Kate Bishop in the upcoming Disney+ show Hawkeye; Kathryn Newton will play an older Cassie Lang in Ant-Man and the Wasp: Quantumania; and Xochitl Gomez will play America Chavez in Doctor Strange in the Multiverse of Madness. These news nuggets are almost a dead giveaway that a Young Avengers franchise is on the horizon, and Billy and Tommy could be its next heroes.

Watch WandaVision on Disney+

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Who Is Geraldine? Monica Rambeau Wandavision Theories

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monica rambeau in wandavision

In case Marvel Studios hasn’t drilled this into your brain yet, allow me to do so: Everything is connected. Avengers: Age of Ultron and WandaVision? Connected! Doctor Strange and Spider-Man? Connected! So, if Geraldine’s (Teyonah Parris) introduction in last week’s episode of WandaVision on Disney+ made you go, Huh, she’s probably more important than she seems, then bingo! You’re catching on.

As of the airing of episode 3, “Now In Color,” this spunky Westview-dweller has yet to reveal her true identity. But virtually every fan has already checked IMDB to discover Geraldine is, in fact, “Monica Rambeau/Geraldine,” as confirmed by MCU overlord Kevin Feige. This means there’s an obvious reason why Wanda Maximoff gets so irked when Geraldine mentions Wanda’s deceased twin brother, Pietro, near the end of the episode: Geraldine is an imposter in Wanda’s sitcom-verse. And her inclusion in the series could have enormous ramifications for the next few chapters of the show—as well as the Marvel Cinematic Universe as a whole.

To make sense of the Maximoff vs. Monica debacle, here’s a quick primer on the powerful Miss Rambeau. Then, we’ll run through a few theories as to what Monica is doing in the Wanda-verse. Patience, MCU fans. It’ll all make sense eventually. Hopefully.

Suzanne Tenner

You’ve seen Monica Rambeau before.

Or, at least, you have if you’ve watched Captain Marvel. In the ’90s-set adventure, Carol Danvers, aka Captain Marvel, frequently visits her bestie Maria Rambeau, a former Air Force pilot and single mother. Her daughter is named Monica—Carol sometimes calls her Lieutenant Trouble—and the two are super close. At this point in the MCU, Monica shows no clear signs of a superheroic future, though she obviously idolizes her “Aunt” Carol. At the end of the film, Nick Fury implies that if she wants to fly to space like Carol, she’ll need to get “glowy.”

Flash forward to WandaVision, which takes place after Endgame, and Monica has grown up. We can assume from the S.W.O.R.D. pendant Wanda notices around her neck that she’s working with the Sentient World Observation and Response Department, a subdivision of S.H.I.E.L.D. What we don’t know is if she has any superpowers (yet), or if she ever teams up with her aunt.

geraldine and wanda in wandavision

Monica and Wanda in WandaVision episode 2, “Don’t Touch That Dial.”

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In the comics, Monica was actually the first female Captain Marvel.

Way back in 1982, comics writer Jim Starlin killed off the original Captain Marvel—a man by the name of Mar-Vell—in The Death of Captain Marvel. Monica, then a lieutenant in the New Orleans Harbor Patrol, had gained superpowers from a blast of extra-dimensional energy via a criminal weapon, and so she took up the Captain Marvel mantle. It wasn’t until 2012 that Carol Danvers assumed the role of Captain Marvel—she was previously known as Ms. Marvel.

If your head is spinning, don’t worry—in the MCU, Carol is indeed the first and only Captain Marvel, and we’ve yet to learn Monica’s superhero name (if she has one). But this comics backstory is important context to keep in mind: Rambeau has been a comics fan-favorite for decades, and that will likely contribute to her role in WandaVision and beyond.

teyonah parris as monica rambeau in marvel studios' wandavision

Marvel Studios

She goes by many names.

Confusingly, Captain Marvel is far from the only alter ego Monica has assumed over the years. She changed her name to Photon when Genis-Vell, the son of the O.G. Captain Marvel, took up his father’s title. She changed it again, to Pulsar, when Genis-Vell, in a truly iconic display of masculine entitlement, decided he wanted to be Photon instead. Monica then changed her identity—again—to Spectrum, which she held onto when Thanos launched his attack on Earth.

All this is to say, we have no clue which name Monica will assume if and when she reveals her powers in the MCU.

In an interview with Variety, Parris explained, “Monica Rambeau has held many monikers over the decades, and I think they’ve all been really special in a very particular way. I don’t know how or who she will be in the MCU. Because when I tell you, she changes names and she kicks butt in all of them. So, I don’t know who she will be in her superhero form. But I am excited by the thought of many of them.”

She has a lot of powers, any one of which could shift the landscape of WandaVision.

Among Monica’s many accolades, she is also, arguably, one of the more powerful heroes in the Marvel universe. She can:

  • Use her power over light beams to change others’ perception of her appearance, in effect shape-shifting
  • Fly
  • Move at superhuman speed
  • Phase through solid matter, much like Vision himself
  • Absorb and blast energy through her hands
  • Share a sort of “energy consciousness” with the cosmic universe, perceiving what is happening elsewhere without being near it

    In the comics, she’s also…well, immortal. So that might be important!

    We, of course, don’t know how many of these powers, if any, Monica might have in the MCU, but that last one in particular could open up major possibilities. If she can sense where something is wrong in the universe, she might be able to discern imbalances within the multiverse, thus allowing her to penetrate different realities—such as Wanda’s sitcom-verse.

    She could be the key to unraveling the mystery of WandaVision.

    At the end of “Now In Color,” we watch Geraldine crash-land from her comfy spot in Westview into a field in New Jersey, where she lies groaning in the grass. We can’t be positive who sent her away, though it’s probably safe to assume Wanda was involved.

    Here’s where we start theorizing. If Geraldine is Monica, and Monica is a S.W.O.R.D. agent, she must have infiltrated the sitcom-verse somehow, whether intentionally or unintentionally. If intentionally, it’s likely S.W.O.R.D. sent her in directly—maybe via some sort of photon beam. (Don’t concern yourself too much with the physics of the MCU. You’ll hurt yourself.)

    Why Monica? Well, if she does indeed have superhuman abilities, she’s probably one of the only heroes Wanda wouldn’t recognize, given Miss Maximoff’s adventures with the Avengers. If, say, Natasha Romanoff or Carol Danvers had suddenly appeared in Westview, that might have tripped one or two of Wanda’s alarms. But Monica might also have some of that “energy consciousness” I mentioned, which could make her more perceptive to Wanda’s irregular energy spikes.

    But if Monica is just a mere human like the rest of us, she might have some sort of insight to the multiverse that the other S.W.O.R.D agents don’t, perhaps due to her connection with Carol. Regardless, now that Monica’s been sent spiraling back to, presumably, a S.W.O.R.D base in the “real” world, it’s likely we’ll start seeing more of the outside looking in. WandaVision is finally peeling back the curtain.

    Watch WandaVision on Disney+

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