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Shooting at Wisconsin casino leaves two workers dead

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Shooting at Wisconsin casino leaves two workers dead

A gunman opened fire at a Wisconsin casino Saturday night, killing two people and seriously injuring another before he was shot dead by police.

The shooting took place around 7:30 at the Duck Creek Restaurant, inside a Radisson on the grounds of the Oneida Casino in a suburb of Green Bay, police said in a press conference early Sunday morning.

The shooter apparently had a personal relationship with an employee of the restaurant, and went there to kill that person, police said.

His target was not there, and he instead opened fire on the workers colleagues, officials believe.

“There was some relationship that had to do with employment. Whether or not they all work there, that’s something we’re working on,” an investigator said.

Gambler <a href=”http://&lt;!– wp:paragraph –> <p>Gambler Max Westphal recounted the harrowing incident to WBAY-TV. </p> Max Westphal recounted the harrowing incident to local network WBAY-TV.

“All of a sudden we hear a massive flurry of gunshots — 20 to 30 gunshots for sure,” Westphal told the station.

“We took off running towards the highway … There had to have been 50 cop cars that came by on the highway. It was honestly insane.”

The identities of the victims and suspect have not been released.

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New book reveals how to win friends and influence post-COVID

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New book reveals how to win friends and influence post-COVID

Prior to the pandemic, Jon Levy was best known as the founder of the Influencers Dinner, a regular roving dinner party of A-listers — strangers to each other — pulled from different industries. The location would be revealed shortly before the event, and there were a few ground rules: Everyone would cook dinner together, and no one could reveal their last name or where they worked. 

It was all very mysterious. 

“There would always be this moment where people arrive for the cocktail hour,” says Levy, a behavioral scientist and author of the new book, “You’re Invited: The Art and Science of Cultivating Influence.” “And they invariably say, ‘Do you mind if I call my wife? I just want to tell her I still have my kidneys.’ ” Past guests have included Nobel laureates, Olympic athletes, executives, scientists, and the Grammy-winning voice of the bark from “Who Let the Dogs Out.” 

This past year, when the COVID-19 pandemic forced everyone to their Zoom squares to socialize digitally, Levy realized that virtual events can be rewarding — they just have to be planned differently. 

“When TV came out, the answer to programming wasn’t to have people reading soap operas. The new platform created a new way to engage, and that’s the same with digital,” he explains. “When we design our events, we design the experiences to focus on you, the individual, so you feel you’re connecting with people. We start off by putting people in breakout rooms to meet each other. The key is not to leave people to interview each other. Humans do best when there’s a shared effort or activity. If I give you a puzzle to figure out or an icebreaker game, that’s really important. These games cause a shared investment of effort. Now you’re a team.” 

Levy’s work as a behavioral scientist focuses on influence and human connection, never more important than in the current times. 

“I really value bringing people together. And when you look at the research, people are getting lonelier and more isolated,” says Levy. “I’m all for people earning more money and having nice things, but it just doesn’t carry the day. And [by writing this], I was hoping that if I worked hard enough, we can begin to shift the cultural conversation about what gives people a higher quality of life.” 

Check out jonlevytlb.com/games for several different examples of activities to be played at virtual events. 

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Body of missing KPMG executive Alan White found in Texas

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Body of missing KPMG executive Alan White found in Texas

The body of a Dallas businessman who has been missing since October was found in a wooded area of the Texas city.

A survey crew working for Paul Quinn College found human remains near the campus Thursday, police said.

The Dallas County Medical Examiner identified the remains as Alan White, an executive at accounting firm KPMG who was last seen gassing up his Porsche after a gym visit on Oct. 22.

The 55-year-old’s vehicle was found about a week later, and there were no signs of a struggle or accident.

“Your mind goes through all these scenarios of what could’ve happened,” White’s husband Rusty Jenkins said at the time. “But it’s all just kind of guesses until we get some facts or some leads. But your mind plays games all day of what did happen, what could’ve happened.”

There is a $10,000 reward for information related to the case.

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Disney World drops outdoor mask requirement

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Disney World drops outdoor mask requirement

The only people required to wear masks outside at Disney World will be the costumed characters.

The Orlando, Fla., park will only require customers to wear masks in indoor areas and on public transportation beginning Saturday, Blog Mickey reported.

The Friday announcement comes a day after Disney chief executive Bob Chapek touted the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention decision to lift mask requirements as “very big news,” that will cause an attendance spike at theme parks.

A relaxed mask policy, Chapek added, will be a relief to Disney World customers, “particularly if anybody’s been in Florida in the middle of summer with a mask on. That could be quite daunting.”

 Disneyland in California is still subject to the state’s mask order. 

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