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Research: A market where consumers can pay for privacy is emerging

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Research: A market where consumers can pay for privacy is emerging

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Location tracking, e-commerce history, online buying behavior, and biometric information — there has been a slow but consistent erosion of consumer privacy.

Consumers used to be very comfortable sharing personal data with brands in order to see more personalized content, but that is no longer the case. In fact, they increasingly see privacy as a premium product feature.

Some companies are responding to this shift in privacy expectations, and Apple has already begun to corner this new market. Apple’s new transparency features will allow consumers to choose how their data is managed and handled. This puts them at loggerheads with Facebook, whose $40 billion digital advertising business will be in its direct line of fire.

But just how much are consumers willing to pay?

A hidden market for privacy

Product marketing expert Ajit Ghuman recently conducted a research study directly measuring the price consumers place on privacy. The resulting Emerging Market For Privacy report, conducted with Conjoint Analysis (CA), analyzed social media subscriptions and smartphone usage. The variables under consideration were a combination of privacy- and price-based attributes.

The findings were very telling.

There is a $14-$18 Billion Market for a fully secure social media network

Ghuman found that 42% of US consumers are willing to pay $12 per month for complete privacy on a social media network, and as much as 50% of US consumers are willing to pay $8 per month for a fully private social media network. People are showing a strong willingness to secure their information even if it means they need to shell out a fixed amount month-on-month.

A hidden market segment emerges based on shopping habits

GhumanPrivacyStudyFig 2

Active online shoppers are defined as those who are ‘Very Likely’ to make a purchase online in the next 12 months. Their willingness to pay for a social media subscription is a low $4 a month. With their regular and repeated online spending habits, privacy doesn’t feature too high on their list of concerns. Others — those who are not very likely to make an online purchase, show a greater degree of concern, and are willing to part with $10 per month — if full privacy can be delivered for a social media subscription. It’s interesting these two segments form roughly half of the consumers surveyed, indicating a significant opportunity to build privacy-first products for consumers who aren’t regular shoppers.

Working age adults will pay the most for privacy

GhumanPrivacyStudyFig 3

Young Americans below 25 years of age are less willing to pay for privacy. But that changes above the age of 25 with 25-34 year olds willing to pay the most on average for privacy, with the willingness to spend decaying at older ages. This potentially indicates a need to protect personal income and wealth from the risk of loss of personal data.

Men want secure social media. Women want secure smartphones

GhumanPrivacyStudyFig 4

In a surprising finding, it appears that women value smartphone privacy more than they value privacy on Social Media platforms. Men on the other hand, showed a greater willingness to pay for privacy in social media subscriptions than for smartphone data privacy.

Android buyers will pay more for privacy than iPhone users

GhumanPrivacyStudyFig 5

Consumers who are very likely to purchase an Android phone are willing to pay $3 more for a social media product and $10 for the smartphone purchase than consumers who are likely to purchase an iPhone. This result is not very surprising given a generally weaker perception of privacy in the Android ecosystem.

There is compelling new evidence that there is a new market for privacy. In the face-off between Apple and Facebook, it is clear that it is consumers preferences and their willingness to pay driving the difference in strategies. But Apple vs Facebook is just the beginning. There will yet be new companies that will take birth to address the needs of these new privacy-first consumers.

Ajit Ghuman is the author of Price To Scale and is a SaaS Product Marketing veteran who has helped firms such as Narvar, Medallia, Helpshift, and Feedzai differentiate their products, grow revenue and win. He likes to write on all things Product Marketing, and is featured in Sharebird.com‘s list of Top 50 Product Marketing Mentors for 2021. Ajit has a Masters in Management Science from Stanford University and a Bachelors in Electronics and Communication Engineering from Delhi University.

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Replicated: Demand for on-premises software equally as strong as SaaS

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Replicated: Demand for on-premises software equally as strong as SaaS

Join Transform 2021 this July 12-16. Register for the AI event of the year.


While there is a strong demand for cloud applications and software-as-a-service, security, regulatory, and compliance requirements continue to drive demand for on-premises software. In a new Dimensional Research report, 92% of companies said on-premises software was growing. The report, sponsored by Replicated, a software delivery and management company, found that current customer demand for on-premises software was equal to that of public cloud.

Above: Customer demand for on-premises software delivery isn’t slowing down anytime soon.

While it may be popular to believe that “cloud is king” and SaaS is the best and most in-demand modern enterprise software, data shows that demand for on-premises software is equally as strong. It’s the smart choice for customers operating under security, regulatory, and compliance requirements; many organizations cannot allow their customer data to be shared in multi-tenant environments. Additionally, software companies that do not currently provide an on-premises solution to customers leave money on the table and miss a significant business and competitive opportunity.

This new report from Dimensional Research, sponsored by Replicated, highlights the missed business opportunities for software vendors who are not offering an on-premises version. The report provides detailed insights around the current use, need, and challenges for on-premises software and its installation, configuration and management. This report also takes a closer look at the parallel rise in the adoption of container-based applications and the use of Kubernetes.

Perhaps the most important findings are that 92% of surveyed participants reported their on-premises software sales as growing, and that on-premises solutions are equally as popular as their public cloud alternatives. This directly counters the popular narrative that SaaS has overtaken on-premises software delivery, as security and data protection stay top of mind for enterprise software customers.

The survey from Dimensional Research includes feedback from 405 business and technology professionals at executive and manager seniority levels, representing software companies of all sizes around the world across a wide variety of different industries.

Read the full report from Replicated

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Roblox hits Q1 bookings of $652.3 million, up 161%, in first report as public company

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Roblox's user-generated game characters.

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Roblox, the platform for Lego-like user-generated games, reported its earnings for the first time as a publicly traded company. This met analysts’ expectations. Bookings for the first quarter ended March 31 were $652.3 million, up 161% from the same quarter a year ago.

Roblox has done among its target audience of children and teens during the pandemic, as players turned to it for remote, socially distanced play with their friends at a time when they couldn’t meet in-person.

Roblox previously raised $520 million at a $29.5 billion valuation in a financing round ahead of its direct listing on the New York Stock Exchange as a public company. It opened on March 10 at a valuation of $41.9 billion a share and has hovered around that value. Investors greeted the results positively, with Roblox trading up 5% at $67.18 a share in after-hours trading.

Q1 results

Analysts expected a loss of 21 cents a share on bookings of $568.6 million. Most video game companies emphasize non-GAAP bookings, or the total value of virtual currency purchases by players during the quarter, instead of revenues, which under accounting rules are limited to those purchases that are expected to be fully resolved within a certain time period. For instance, a player may buy Robux currency in the first quarter, but spend it over 10 months. That revenue has to be recognized over time, as it is spent inside the platform’s games.

Roblox’s quarterly revenue came in at $387 million, up 140% from a year earlier. The GAAP net loss for the quarter was $134.2 million. But operating cash flow as positive, and so that means cash is coming into the business, said chief business officer Craig Donata in an interview with GamesBeat.

“We had a strong quarter in terms of bookings, revenue, and operating cash flow, and more important, in terms of daily active user growth and time spent by players,” Donato said.

Roblox gets a 30% cut from the bookings generated by sales of Robux, the virtual currency used by players to play user-generated games, the company’s bookings for 2020 were $1.9 billion, double what they were the year before. Roblox’s games have become so popular that people have played the best ones billions of times. On average, 32.6 million people come to Roblox every day. More than 1.25 million creators have made money in Roblox. In the year ended December 31, 2020, users spent 30.6 billion hours engaged on the platform, an average of 2.6 hours per daily active user each day.

Above: Roblox’s user-generated game characters.

Image Credit: Roblox

Net cash provided by operating activities increased nearly four times in Q1 2021 over Q1 2020 to $164.5 million (including one-time direct listing expenses of $51.9 million). Exclusive of one-time expenses related to the direct listing, net cash provided by operating activities would have been $216.4 million.

Free cash flow increased 4.1 times over Q1 2020 to $142.1 million. Average daily active users (DAUs) were 42.1 million, an increase of 79% year over year driven by 87% growth in DAUs outside of the U.S. and Canada and 111% growth in DAUs over the age of 13.

Hours engaged were 9.7 billion, an increase of 98% year over year primarily driven by 104% growth in engagement in markets outside of the U.S. and Canada, and 128% growth from users over the age of 13. Average bookings per DAU (ABPDAU) was $15.48, an increase of 46% year over year.

April results

Rather than make forecasts about how its upcoming quarter is expected to go, Roblox is not making a forecast. Rather, it is disclosing the actual results for the month of April, which is part of the second quarter.

For the month of April alone, daily active users were 43.3 million, up 37% from April of last year and up sequentially from 42.3 million in the month of March 2021. Hours engaged in April were 3.2 billion, up 18% year over year and flat sequentially from March 2021.

Bookings were between $242 million and $245 million, up 59% to 61% year over year and up sequentially 7% to 9% from March 2021 when bookings were $225.3 million.

Average bookings per DAU were between $5.59 to $5.66, up 16% to 17% year over year and 5% to 6% sequentially from March 2021. April revenue was $143 million to $145 million, up 136% to 140% year over year and 5% to 7% sequentially from March 2021.

“Our first quarter 2021 results enabled us to continue investing aggressively in the key areas that we believe will drive long term growth and value, specifically hiring talented engineering and product professionals and growing the earnings for our developer community,” said chief financial officer of Roblox Michael Guthrie,  in a statement. “We believe we must continue to innovate and so remain focused on building great technology to make progress on our key growth vectors, primarily international expansion and expanding the age demographic of our users.”

The company closed the March quarter with 1,054 employees, up from 651 a year earlier.

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IronSource’s Supersonic launches LiveGames publishing service for indies

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IronSource's Supersonic launches LiveGames publishing service for indies

Did you miss GamesBeat Summit 2021? Watch on-demand here! 


Mobile monetization firm IronSource said its Supersonic Studios division has launched LiveGames, a self-service way for indie game developers to manage mobile games and their live services (such as tournaments or updates).

This is for Supersonic publishing solution, which IronSource launched more than a year ago. The announcement comes after it announced that it plans to go public via a special purpose acquisition company (SPAC) at an $11.1 billion valuation.

The product offers developers who publish their mobile games with Supersonic access to game management and full visibility and transparency into in-game metrics that enable them to better manage and grow their published games.

Nadav Ashkenazy, the general manager of Supersonic Studios, said in an interview with GamesBeat that the goal is to make publishing tools accessible to indie developers so they can get their games off the ground. It helps with the “growth loop,” after a game reaches a large scale and then needs attention in terms of improving numbers, such as the average playtime per user.

“After you scale a game globally, everything gets more complicated,” Ashkenazy said. “For average playtime per user, we give you a snapshot for that.”

The idea is to support developers as independent companies by productizing what is otherwise a manual process. It also adds some important transparency for developers that they normally can’t get out of game publishers, said Omer Kaplan, the chief revenue officer at IronSource, in an interview with GamesBeat.

“Historically, publishing is a black box,” Kaplan said. “A developer’s game meets retention goals. Then a publisher handles growth and gives a revenue share. We make everything transparent. We have complete transparency for the developers using our publishing solution on the IronSource platform.”

Several rival products in the market help developers test the performance and marketability of their prototypes, with IronSource launching its self-serve testing product for Supersonic developers in 2020. However, one of the biggest challenges comes once a game has been published, since many of the insights relating to a game and its performance are not commonly visible to the developer, limiting the ability to understand, test, iterate and improve for the long term.

Above: IronSource’s LiveGames helps studios manage their game data.

Image Credit: IronSource

With Supersonic, IronSource has focused on helping game companies become better developers, rather than treat each game as a standalone unit.

Through LiveGames, developers will have access to data such as daily, monthly, and annual profit for each of their published games; advanced analytics including retention, playtime, lifetime value, and ad engagement for each region and user acquisition channel; rewarded video and interstitial ad analysis; and advanced analytics from A/B tests for test comparison.

Stan Mettra, the CEO of game studio Born2play, is using LiveGames with the game StackyDash. He said in a statement this is the first time the company has so many insights into the performance of the game. That helps take away blind spots and helps the company take steps to increase revenue. About 25 studios used the LiveGames service in alpha testing and they’re now ready to start using the product.

“We’re encouraging the developers to remain independent,” Kaplan said.

Tel Aviv, Israel-based IronSource has previously said it would raise $2.3 billion in cash proceeds for both shareholders and the company itself through the transactions, which includes both the proceeds from the SPAC (a faster way of going public compared to an initial public offering) and an additional private investment known as a PIPE, or private investment in a public equity. SPACs have become a popular way for fast-moving companies to go public without all the hassle of a traditional IPO. Regulators have come up with more rules to govern SPACs, but the idea is to raise money faster.

IronSource said it recorded 2020 revenue of $332 million and adjusted earnings before interest, taxes, depreciation, and amortization (EBITDA) of $104 million. IronSource said its monetization platform is designed to enable any app or game developer to turn their app into a scalable, successful business by helping them to monetize and analyze their app and grow and engage their users through multiple channels, including unique on-device distribution through partnerships with telecom operators such as Orange and a device makers such as Samsung.

In 2020, IronSource said 94% of its revenues came from 291 customers with more than $100,000 of annual revenue, a dollar-based net expansion rate of 149%.

GamesBeat

GamesBeat’s creed when covering the game industry is “where passion meets business.” What does this mean? We want to tell you how the news matters to you — not just as a decision-maker at a game studio, but also as a fan of games. Whether you read our articles, listen to our podcasts, or watch our videos, GamesBeat will help you learn about the industry and enjoy engaging with it.

How will you do that? Membership includes access to:

  • Newsletters, such as DeanBeat
  • The wonderful, educational, and fun speakers at our events
  • Networking opportunities
  • Special members-only interviews, chats, and “open office” events with GamesBeat staff
  • Chatting with community members, GamesBeat staff, and other guests in our Discord
  • And maybe even a fun prize or two
  • Introductions to like-minded parties

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