Connect with us

Breaking News

Police had no basis to stop, frisk Elijah McClain: probe

Published

on

Police had no basis to stop, frisk Elijah McClain: probe

Police officers in Aurora, Colorado had no reasonable basis to stop and frisk Elijah McClain, or put him in a chokehold, according to an independent investigation into the unarmed black man’s fatal 2019 arrest released on Monday.

The probe by a panel of outside legal and medical experts was commissioned by the Aurora City Council as the 23-year-old’s death drew new attention last spring during the nationwide protests against racism and police brutality.

The 153-page report resulting from the probe blasted the police department’s handling of an earlier investigation into the deadly encounter and criticized the decision by paramedics to inject McClain with the sedative ketamine.

McClain was stopped by police as he was walking home from a convenience store on Aug. 24, 2019 after someone reported him as suspicious.

But “none of the officers articulated a crime that they thought Mr. McClain had committed, was committing or was about to commit,” the report found.

It took cops just 10 seconds “to turn what may have been a consensual encounter with Mr. McClain into an investigatory stop” without apparent grounds, investigators wrote.

“This decision had ramifications for the rest of the encounter.”

Officers used a neckhold on McClain that stops the flood of blood to the brain, rendering him temporarily unconscious.

Paramedics then injected him with 500 milligrams of ketamine “without conducting anything more than a brief visual observation,” the report states.

“At the time of the injection, Mr. McClain had not moved or made any sounds for about one minute,” investigators wrote.

“In addition, EMS administered a ketamine dosage based on a grossly inaccurate and inflated estimate of Mr. McClain’s size.”

McClain went into cardiac arrest during the encounter and died days later at a hospital.

The renewed scrutiny around his death sparked several investigations, including a probe into possible criminal charges by the Colorado Attorney General’s Office that remains in progress.

Earlier probes by city departments determined that the cops and paramedics didn’t violate policy and a local district attorney declined to bring charges.

But the report released Monday found that Aurora police “failed to ask basic, critical questions” about the incident that would have helped prosecutors determine whether the use of force was justified.

Police investigators instead asked questions that appeared specifically designed to “exonerate the officers rather than present a neutral version of the facts,” the report states.

The investigators recommended several changes to policies around how cops and paramedics are trained and urged the city to consider overhauling how it reviews incidents.

McClain’s family last year filed a federal civil rights lawsuit against the city and the cops and emergency responders involved in the young man’s death.

Family lawyer Mari Newman said Monday’s report “confirms what we have known all along: Aurora police and medics violated Elijah McClain’s civil rights, and Aurora did everything in its power to sweep his murder under the rug.”

With Post wires

Continue Reading
Advertisement
Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Breaking News

Texas man shoots wife, then himself inside doctor’s office

Published

on

By

Texas man shoots wife, then himself inside doctor's office

A man shot and injured his wife inside a west Houston doctor’s office on Monday before turning the gun on himself, a report said.

Andrew Wang, 64, was at the medical office next to the Woman’s Hospital of Texas when he carried out the violence just before 3 p.m., Click2Houston.com reported, citing police.

“I’m going to kill you, I want you to die,” Wang was overheard saying before firing two shots at his wife, then himself, according to police.

Wang was declared dead on scene. Police found a gun at the office.

His wife was hospitalized with gunshot wounds to her chest and forearm, the report said. As of Tuesday morning, she was in stable condition.

Continue Reading

Breaking News

Investigators retrieve ‘black box’ data from Tiger Woods’ SUV

Published

on

By

Investigators retrieve 'black box' data from Tiger Woods' SUV

Investigators working to determine the cause of Tiger Woods’ rollover crash have obtained data stored in the “black box” of the luxury SUV he was driving, a report said.

The Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department executed a search warrant to gather the information, which could show the vehicle’s speed before the collision and whether its brakes were applied, authorities told USA Today.

“We’re trying to determine if a crime was committed,” Sheriff’s Deputy John Schloegl told the news outlet.

“If somebody is involved in a traffic collision, we’ve got to reconstruct the traffic collision. If there was any reckless driving, if somebody was on their cell phone or something like that. If there was no crime, we close out the case, and it was a regular traffic collision.”

Woods was driving a 2021 Genesis GV80 alone when he veered across the median on Hawthorne Boulevard in Rancho Palos Verdes, went off the road and struck a tree.

The legendary golfer broke several bones in his lower right leg and is still recovering in the hospital.

A forensic car expert had told USA Today that it appeared Woods was not paying attention in the moments before the devastating crash.

“To me, this is like a classic case of falling asleep behind the wheel, because the road curves and his vehicle goes straight,” Jonathan Cherney, a consultant who serves as an expert witness in court cases, told the news outlet.

Felix Lee, an accident reconstruction expert, told the outlet: “My feeling is that speed wasn’t that much of an issue. It was just some kind of inattention that caused the curb strike.”

Continue Reading

Breaking News

Brazilian COVID-19 variant found in Oregon

Published

on

By

Brazilian COVID-19 variant found in Oregon

SALEM, Ore. — A coronavirus variant that was first detected in Brazil has emerged in Oregon, the first known case of the new variant on the contiguous U.S. West Coast, medical authorities said Tuesday.

The sample was sent to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention at the end of January by medical officials in Douglas County, Oregon. They said they received the results back on Monday night, which showed the P.1 variant.

“The P.1 variant … appears to be related to business travel outside the United States to and from Brazil,” the Douglas County COVID-19 Response Team said in a statement Tuesday.

The variant, which was first found in Manaus, Brazil, appears to be more contagious than other COVID-19 strains. It can potentially be contracted by someone who was already infected or who has been vaccinated.

There have been 10 additional cases of the P.1 variant reported in the U.S., with five in Florida, two in Minnesota and one each in Oklahoma, Alaska and Maryland, the CDC says.

Health officials in Douglas County, located in western Oregon, said they are awaiting results of other samples that were sent to the CDC for genome sequence DNA testing for emerging COVID-19 variants.

The Oregon Health Authority said the unidentified person who contracted the Brazilian variant has been working closely with the local health department and has been self-isolating.

Health officials on Tuesday also reported 13 new coronavirus-related deaths in the state, raising the known death toll to 2,225. There were 269 new confirmed and presumptive cases in the state, for a total of 156,037, authorities said.

Continue Reading

Trending