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Petition to cancel Colton Underwood show gets 21K signatures

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Petition to cancel Colton Underwood show gets 21K signatures

Harassment allegations against former “Bachelor” star Colton Underwood have led to over 21,000 people signing a petition for Netflix to cancel an upcoming show about him.

The Change.org petition, which has over 21,000 signatures as of this writing, exclusively critiques Underwood’s treatment of his ex, Cassie Randolph — and not his recent announcement that he is gay. Randolph, 25, was granted a restraining order in 2020 against Underwood, 29, although she later dropped it. 

“Colton is a former bachelor lead who stalked his final pick, Cassie Randolph. He placed a tracker on her car, sent her and her friends anonymous threatening texts, and was even seen standing outside her window extremely late in the night, resulting in her brother attempting to de-escalate the situation,” claims the petition, which was started by an anonymous user. “Cassie is a victim of Colton’s abuse, and he does not deserve a platform in any way. Regardless of his sexuality, Colton should not be given a platform as a result of his abusive, manipulative, and dangerous behavior.”

Last week, after Underwood came out as gay in a “Good Morning America” interview, Variety reported that the former NFL player is getting his own reality show. “Colton began filming prior to going on ‘Good Morning America,’” a source told Page Six of a documentary Underwood had reportedly been working on prior to the interview. “The docuseries has been in the works for a few weeks.”

“Bachelor” fans immediately reinvigorated their calls for a gay season of “The Bachelor” after Underwood’s announcement about his sexuality. Should it come to fruition, however, many on social media feel strongly that Underwood should not lead it. 

“To everyone saying he should get another season and be the first gay bachelor — are you forgetting how he treated Cassie?? That he put a literal tracker on her car??” wrote one Twitter critic

Neither Netflix nor Underwood immediately responded to The Post’s request for comment.

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Leonardo Dicaprio unrecognizable in first photos of new film

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Leonardo Dicaprio unrecognizable in first photos of new film

Apple has released the first-ever photos from Martin Scorsese’s highly anticipated Western, “Killers of the Flower Moon.”

The pics depict Leonardo DiCaprio and Lily Gladstone as Ernest and Mollie Burkhart, a white man and an Osage woman who fall in love in Oklahoma during the early 20th century, IndieWire reported.

In the first look, fans see a notably plain-looking DiCaprio, 46, seated aside Gladstone, 34, lit starkly in a dining room.

The couple’s relationship forms the backdrop for “Flower Moon,” which is based on David Grann’s best-selling book of the same name. The nonfiction work chronicles the Osage Nation murders, in which Native Americans in 1920s Oklahoma were massacred after oil was discovered on their land.

Notably, Gladstone herself is Native American, and grew up on the Blackfeet reservation in Montana.

Starring opposite Gladstone and DiCaprio is a decorated supporting cast that includes Robert De Niro, Jesse Plemons, Cara Jade Myers, Janae Collins, Jillian Dion, William Belleau, Jason Isbell, Louis Cancelmi, Scott Shepherd, Sturgill Simpson and many others.

Scorsese began filming on “Flower Moon” on April 19 after getting delayed over a year due to COVID-19 concerns.

“We are thrilled to finally start production on ‘Killers of the Flower Moon’ in Oklahoma,” “The Irishman” director said in a statement last month regarding the film, which he is producing and directing based on a screenplay by himself and Eric Roth.

“To be able to tell this story on the land where these events took place is incredibly important and critical to allowing us to portray an accurate depiction of the time and people.”

“Flower Moon” is slated for theatrical release by Paramount with funding from Apple (which appears at odds with Scorsese’s highly publicized distaste for streaming services). It currently does not have a release date.

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Cult flick ‘Faces of Death’ to get modern reimagining

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Cult flick ‘Faces of Death’ to get modern reimagining

This VHS-age favorite is being remade for the streaming era. 

Production company Legendary Entertainment has acquired the rights to “Faces of Death” and has plans to reboot the beloved 1978 faux-documentary as a modern horror franchise, according to the Hollywood Reporter. 

Legendary — which has previously produced blockbusters including “Godzilla vs. Kong,” “John Wick” and “The Dark Knight” — will be working with Isa Mazzei and Daniel Goldhaber of 2018’s psychological memoir-based thriller “Cam” for the flick.

When “Faces of Death” was released over 40 years ago, it was promoted as a documentary — similar to 1999’s “The Blair Witch Project” — successfully inciting outrage at its gruesome content. While the footage was staged, audiences initially believed it to be real.

The premise of the flick — which subsequently was both banned (although not by 52 countries, as promotional materials stated) and became a box office hit — was a pathologist’s look into the most horrific ways in the world to die, the Hollywood Reporter recounted. The true cult status of “Faces of Death” arrived in the 1980s, when it became a VHS-market phenomenon, with copies of it reproduced and shared widely. 

The original film is still in circulation thanks to one Illinois-based company. 

Angry Films’ Susan Montford and Don Murphy are set to produce and Rick Benattar of BT Productions will executive produce, THR wrote. 

The producer of the original film, John Burrud, will also be part of the team reimagining the movie. 

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Nickelback fans are now getting catfished

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Nickelback fans are now getting catfished

Nickelback fans have had it rough. 

First, they’ve had to defend their favorite band from jokesters on the internet who’ve mercilessly mocked the group for years. 

Now, they’re getting catfished. 

Devotees of the Canadian rock group are being contacted by profiles pretending to be band members Chad Kroeger, Ryan Peake, Mike Kroeger and Daniel Adair. Some are looking for love; others money in the form of Bitcoin or iTunes gift cards. None of them are real, but committed supporters respond anyway, on the off chance their celebrity crush is on the other side of the screen.

It’s gotten so bad that in July, the band tweeted out a message to remind followers to keep their guard up. “Friendly reminder that the only official Nickelback Twitter account is right here, along with Mr. @TheDanielAdair,” they wrote. “Look for the blue checkmark to know it’s the real deal on all social networks. Report any accounts that are claiming otherwise.” 

Queens resident Nicole Godja has been contacted by several profiles pretending to be frontman Chad Kroeger since last year, on Instagram, Facebook and Google Hangouts. She follows the band on their verified Instagram account, and was part of a Facebook fan group, where several other members have been contacted by fake accounts. 

“Thank you for following my page and for the love and support you’ve all showered on me and the whole of nickelback team I hope you never stop supporting us and listening to our songs,” a profile with the handle @chad__robert_kroeger_ messaged her in October. (While that account no longer exists, at least a dozen phonies have popped up in its place.)

The translator, 48, was immediately suspicious. “There were red flags,” she told The Post. The account wasn’t verified, it had no profile picture and only 70 followers. Still, she kept up the conversation, curious about the person who had contacted her, whoever it may be. “I had doubts that it would be him, so I asked him basic things about him,” she said. “It didn’t add up.” 

One of the many Nickelback memes circulating on the internet.

The account was “flirting with me from the beginning,” and even said that he loved her, said Godja, who is single. “This guy can have any woman in the world,” she said of Avril Lavigne’s ex-husband. “Why would he go online and look for weirdos?” 

Kroeger and Nickelback did not respond to requests for comment by press time. 

Though Godja said that she never believed she was talking to the real Kroeger, she was in contact with the account almost daily until New Year’s, when she decided to break off communication. The fake Chad wouldn’t send pictures of himself, get on the phone or do a video call with Godja, claiming it was against his manager’s rules to talk to fans.  

He’d also tried to solicit money from her: Both the Facebook and Instagram accounts claimed that he needed her to pay nearly $13,000 in Bitcoin so he could ship a trunk he needed to her house, and the Chad on Hangouts wanted iTunes gift cards from her, saying his managers forbade him from “making money on the side,” said Godja. Knowing she was being scammed, she declined. 

“I feel like a good rule of thumb is that if somebody is employing a manager, they don’t need your money,” Gabrielle Bluestone, author of “Hype: How Scammers, Grifters, and Con Artists Are Taking Over the Internet—and Why We’re Following,” told The Post. “If it seems too good to be true, it probably is.”

Though it’s unclear why Nickelback fans in particular are being targeted, Bluestone said age may play a role. After launching in 1995, the band’s popularity peaked in the late aughts. “People who haven’t grown up on the internet are a bit more susceptible to scams. Older people in general make better targets for scammers,” she said. 

Their devotion to the group is also a key factor: Online fan clubs give scammers “a pool of potential victims that respect the band and want to help them out,” she said.

And despite clear warning signs, die-hard fans often unconsciously want to ignore them. “Everyone wants to be the exception to the rule; people can talk themselves into anything, especially when it’s something they care deeply about,” said Bluestone. 

While verified celebrities like Ben Affleck and Matthew Perry are contacting fans on dating app Raya, the scam expert says you should always be on your toes: “There is the technology to make a fake Ben Affleck video,” she said. “Unless you’re seeing it face-to-face with your own eyes, there should always be a dose of suspicion there.” 

The accounts have since reached back out to Godja, and she continues to speak to them every day, hoping they’ll reveal their true identity to her. She’s reported the Facebook and Hangouts account, and some have been taken down, though the catfish keeps creating more.

“I feel bad that they give a bad name to the band,” said Godja, of the scammers.

“I’m really sad. I will never know [Nickelback] personally, but I don’t think these people deserve that.” 

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