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Oklahoma man kills daughters, self while on phone with wife: cops

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Oklahoma man kills daughters, self while on phone with wife: cops

An Oklahoma man having marital problems with his wife was on the phone with her when he fatally shot their two daughters — and said, “How do you like that?” before turning the gun on himself, authorities said.

The girls’ mother was at work when her husband of 30 years, David Kaser, killed their daughters, 19-year-old Clarissa Kaser and 14-year-old Crystal Kaser, in their Sand Springs home Wednesday afternoon, the Tusla World reported.

She initially called the police so they could do a welfare check because her husband threatened he was going to kill their kids and then himself.

The wife added that while she was on the phone with Kaser, she heard what appeared to be a gunshot and then he said, “How do you like that?” police said.

Cops responded to the home, and when they went inside, they found Kaser, 56, and his teen daughters dead as well as a handgun.

Police say they know a motive for the murder-suicide but will not be revealing it to the public.

However, cops revealed that the Kasers — who have six children together — were having marital issues, and that the husband was taking care of their daughters while he was jobless and disabled, KTUL reported.

“He was upset with her and he was letting her know that,” said Capt. Todd Enzbrenner, according to the outlet.

The Oklahoma State Bureau of Investigation is assisting in the with the investigation.

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Newly-developed vaccine could prevent Lyme disease

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Newly-developed vaccine could prevent Lyme disease

A newly developed vaccine could prevent Lyme disease in humans.

The inoculation against the tick-borne disease, being developed at the University of Massachusetts Medical School, received federal approval last year and is now part of an initial clinical trial, Field & Stream reported.

Work on the vaccine is being spearheaded by Dr. Mark Klempner, a member of the school’s biologics program who has been working on a Lyme cure for a decade, the outlet said.

“A Lyme vaccine that used to be publicly available had been withdrawn and since we understood the mechanism of protection there, we were able to go right after the molecule that we thought would be protective,” Klempner told the Patriot-News.

The vaccine is being tested on 66 patients in Lincoln, Nebraska, and could be available to the public in the the spring of 2023, the reports said.

According to a report in January by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Lyme disease is more prevalent than previously thought — with as many as 400,000 cases reported to the agency every year.

The disease is most commonly transferred to humans through bites from infected black-legged ticks, with the bites typically leaving a characteristic skin rash.

Lyme is rarely fatal but can be debilitating. Symptoms include fever, headaches and fatigue, and it can cause nerve damage, memory loss, and inflammation around the heart if left untreated.

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MS patient sues Austria over health impact of climate change

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MS patient sues Austria over health impact of climate change

BERLIN — A man in Austria with a temperature-dependent form of multiple sclerosis is taking his government to court in an effort to force it to do more against climate change, his lawyers said Tuesday.

The case being filed next month before the European Court of Human Rights is supported by the environmental group Fridays for Future, which is helping to crowdfund the legal costs.

It comes weeks after the Strasbourg-based court said it would continue to fast-track a case by brought six young Portuguese activists who argue European governments aren’t cutting greenhouse emissions in line with the requirements of the 2015 Paris climate accord.

The court, whose jurisdiction covers all countries that have ratified the European Convention for the Protection of Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms, is also hearing a separate case brought by a group of elderly Swiss women.

“The case we are filing will be the third one and will be among the first bundle of cases upon which the court will base its jurisdiction with an effect on all 47 member states (that are subject to the court’s jurisdiction),” said Michaela Kroemer, a lawyer for the Austrian plaintiff.

Her client, identified only as Mex M. for privacy reasons, has Uhthoff’s syndrome, which affects his muscles when temperatures rise above 25 degrees Celsius (77 degrees Fahrenheit).

“The climate crisis already severely impacts his daily life, his personal dignity and his wellbeing,” said Kroemer. Under Austrian law, inaction by the Alpine nation’s legislature can’t be challenged in court, meaning the case is being brought directly to the European court, she said.

Kroemer said her client’s specific situation would be no hindrance to the court making a ruling that is applicable to the general public.

“In a legal context, in a strategic litigation context, it really only takes one person to make a huge difference,” she said.

Since January 2020, Austria has had a coalition government under center-right Chancellor Sebastian Kurz that includes the environmentalist Green party, which oversees the powerful climate, environment and energy ministry.

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Vernon Jordan, activist, former Clinton advisor, has died

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Vernon Jordan, activist, former Clinton advisor, has died

ATLANTA — Vernon Jordan, who rose from humble beginnings in the segregated South to become a champion of civil rights before reinventing himself as a Washington insider and corporate influencer, has died, according to a statement from his daughter. He was 85.

Jordan’s daughter, Vickee Jordan Adams, released the statement Tuesday to CBS News.

“My father passed away last night around 10p surrounded by loved ones his wife and daughter by his side,” she said.

After stints as field secretary for the Georgia NAACP and executive director of the United Negro College Fund, he became head of the National Urban League, becoming the face of black America’s modern struggle for jobs and justice for more than a decade. He was nearly killed by a racist’s bullet in 1980 before transitioning to business and politics.

His friendship with Bill Clinton took them both to the White House. Jordan was an unofficial Clinton aide, drawing him into controversy during the Monica Lewinsky scandal.

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