Connect with us

Living

NYC sewage plant’s strangely popular Valentine’s Day tour goes virtual

Published

on

20200208js_7798_49517651583_o

What better way to express love in the time of a pandemic than virtual sludge.

The NYC Department of Environmental Protection and Open House New York aren’t letting the pandemic end their wildly popular Valentine’s Day tours of a Brooklyn wastewater facility. Instead, they’re making it virtual. 

Tickets for the tours of the Newtown Creek Wastewater Treatment Plant, composed of what are known as digester eggs, reliably sell out soon after being released. So while the virtual adaption has its obvious drawbacks, it will at least remove some of the tour’s exclusivity.

The Feb. 14 tour costs $5 and will take place from 4:30 to 5:30 p.m. on Zoom. 

“Grab a date (or join solo) and take a peek inside the city’s largest sewage treatment plant, where wastewater — collected from storm drains and the toilets and sinks of more than 1 million New Yorkers — is cleaned each day in a complex system, including eight giant stainless steel digester eggs,” reads the Eventbrite ticket page description of the event. The virtual program will focus on the plant’s architecture as well as “how the digester eggs got their shape, why you should not take a shower during a rainstorm and the real problem with ‘flushable’ wipes.”

It will also include a behind-the-scenes video tour, a conversation with DEP director of public design outreach, Alicia West, and an audience Q&A. 

For those looking for COVID-safe, in-person activities this Valentine’s Day, there’s another New York specialty. At 1,131 feet in the air, Edge is the highest outdoor observation deck in the Western Hemisphere and will be opening at 6 a.m. Feb. 14 to let lovebirds enjoy the sunrise together, 6sqft reported. The deck is located on the 100th and 101st floors of 30 Hudson Yards. Tickets go on sale Monday and cost $100 for a sunrise slot and $36 for general admission, or $34 for NYC residents. V-Day tickets also come with optional champagne, rosé champagne and “Cupid’s Cocoa” add-ons.

Every year, the NYC Department of Environmental Protection and Open House New York host a Valentine’s Day tour of the Newtown Creek Wastewater Treatment Plant. This year, due to the pandemic, it will be virtual.

Jean Schwarzwalder

20200208js_8094_49517622763_o

Every year, the NYC Department of Environmental Protection and Open House New York host a Valentine’s Day tour of the Newtown Creek Wastewater Treatment Plant. This year, due to the pandemic, it will be virtual.

Jean Schwarzwalder

20200208js_8111_49518143886_o

Every year, the NYC Department of Environmental Protection and Open House New York host a Valentine’s Day tour of the Newtown Creek Wastewater Treatment Plant. This year, due to the pandemic, it will be virtual.

Jean Schwarzwalder

20200208js_7888_49518167081_o

Every year, the NYC Department of Environmental Protection and Open House New York host a Valentine’s Day tour of the Newtown Creek Wastewater Treatment Plant. This year, due to the pandemic, it will be virtual.

Jean Schwarzwalder

20200208js_7965_49518158611_o

Every year, the NYC Department of Environmental Protection and Open House New York host a Valentine’s Day tour of the Newtown Creek Wastewater Treatment Plant. This year, due to the pandemic, it will be virtual.

Jean Schwarzwalder

20200208js_7935_49518376792_o

Every year, the NYC Department of Environmental Protection and Open House New York host a Valentine’s Day tour of the Newtown Creek Wastewater Treatment Plant. This year, due to the pandemic, it will be virtual.

Jean Schwarzwalder

20200208js_8046_49518151316_o

Every year, the NYC Department of Environmental Protection and Open House New York host a Valentine’s Day tour of the Newtown Creek Wastewater Treatment Plant. This year, due to the pandemic, it will be virtual.

Jean Schwarzwalder

Up Next

yH5BAEAAAAALAAAAAABAAEAAAIBRAA7

Big swing and a miss for the Mets on Friday,…


Continue Reading
Advertisement
Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Living

Ducks escape certain death to visit NYC bagel store

Published

on

By

Ducks escape certain death to visit NYC bagel store

This fowl plot to get bread was nearly eggsecuted perfectly.

On Monday, a gang of ducklings and their mama hatched a plan to eat the bill at a Brooklyn bagel store, and were almost successful in their mission thanks to a group of supportive locals. 

“A real-life ‘Make Way For Ducklings’ scene just unfolded in Brooklyn with this mama duck and her babies trying to cross 5th Ave,” Doug Gordon captioned a video he posted to Twitter of the enterprising bird family’s journey from under an NYPD school safety van and directly into oncoming traffic. “Multiple people helped stop traffic to get them safely across the street. But it gets better . . .”

After spotting the endangered crew of bird brains lolling around in the street, locals immediately went into action. 

“A couple of us jumped out to stop traffic so they didn’t get run over, and then they got to the other side. It was adorable, a real Brooklyn-steps-up sort of moment, New Yorkers taking charge,” Gordon told Gothamist. 

Once safely on the sidewalk, the chicks and their mother beelined for Bagel World Park Slope. 

“They were in there a couple minutes, but I didn’t see what happened inside,” Gordon told the publication. “I don’t know whether they decided to come out because they didn’t see anything on the menu they liked, or if they were chased out.”

In Gordon’s video, the fledgling family exits the eatery, lured out by employees tossing breadcrumbs beyond the premises as onlookers label them “so cute.” 

Gordon and another man then trailed the ducks to ensure they made their way across Fourth Street without injury. 

Later, Gordon learned that the ducks had the good fortune of being escorted four more blocks to Prospect Park by other sympathetic humans. 

“Someone said [they had] led them up to Prospect Park, so they got there safely,” Gordon said. “They waddled into the woods, so it’s a happy ending.”

Continue Reading

Living

Endangered corpse flower blooms in Warsaw, drawing crowds

Published

on

By

The endangered Sumatran Titan arum, or the corpse flower, at the rare moment of bloom for just a few hours, and emitting rotten meat odor, at the Warsaw University Botanical Gardens, in Warsaw, Poland, on Sunday, June 13, 2021.

WARSAW, Poland — The endangered Sumatran Titan arum, a giant foul-smelling blossom also known as the corpse flower, went into a rare, short bloom at a botanical garden in Warsaw, drawing crowds who waited for hours to see it.

The extraordinary flower, which emits a dead-body odor to attract pollinating insects that feed on flesh, bloomed Sunday. It was already withering early Monday. Those wishing to avoid the smell and crowds could watch it on live video from the Warsaw University Botanical Gardens.

 The endangered Sumatran Titan arum, or the corpse flower, at the rare moment of bloom for just a few hours, and emitting rotten meat odor, at the Warsaw University Botanical Gardens, in Warsaw, Poland, on Sunday, June 13, 2021.
The endangered Sumatran Titan arum, or the corpse flower, at the rare moment of bloom for just a few hours and emitting a rotten meat odor, at the Warsaw University Botanical Gardens, on June 13, 2021.
AP

Hundreds, if not thousands, lined up long into the night Sunday and Monday morning at the conservatory just to be able to pass by the flower and take a picture.

Know also as the Amorphophallus titanum, the flowering plant has the largest unbranched inflorescence in the world, which can be up to 10 feet high. Its compound flower is composed of a hollow, tall spadix with small flowers and a spathe, with one big, furrowed petal that is green on the outside and deep burgundy red on the inside. It’s blooming is rare and unpredictable.

The plant only grows in the wild in the rainforests of Sumatra, but it is endangered there due to deforestation. Cultivation at botanical gardens, where they are a great visitor attraction, has helped its preservation. It’s first known blooming outside Sumatra was in 1889 at London’s Royal Botanical Gardens at Kew.

Continue Reading

Living

Europe carbon prices expected to soar amid tougher climate goals

Published

on

By

Steam rises from the cooling towers of the coal power plant of RWE, one of Europe's biggest electricity and gas companies in Niederaussem, Germany, March 3, 2016.

LONDON – Carbon prices in the European Union’s emissions trading system are expected to rise significantly in the next decade due to tougher climate goals, market participants said in an industry survey published on Monday.

The EU’s emissions trading system (ETS) is the largest carbon market in the world, covering around 45% of the bloc’s output of greenhouse gases and charging emitters for every tonne of carbon dioxide they emit.

The survey by the International Emissions Trading Association (IETA) found members expect carbon prices in the EU ETS to average $57 a tonne between 2021 and 2025 and $71.06 a tonne between 2026 and 2030.

This is mainly due to a tougher EU goal of cutting emissions by at least 55% by 2030, compared to 1990 levels.

Last year’s survey predicted an average price of 31.71 euros a tonne for the third phase of the ETS which runs from 2021 to 2030. Benchmark prices in the ETS currently trade around $64.24 a tonne.

Britain’s domestic emissions trading scheme started trading in May this year. The majority of survey respondents expect it will link with the EU scheme by 2023.

Participants anticipate that the average global carbon price needed by 2030 to put the world on track to meet goals to curb global temperature rise is $76.61 a tonne, up from last year’s expectation of $67.84 a tonne.

IETA’s members include banks, exchanges and energy and industrial firms. The association received responses from 158 member representatives for the survey.

Continue Reading

Trending