Connect with us

Living

Moment boat carrying Cuban migrants capsizes after more than 16 days at sea

Published

on

Moment boat carrying Cuban migrants capsizes after more than 16 days at sea

Video shows the moment a vessel carrying eight Cuban migrants, including two pregnant women, capsized after more than 16 days at sea.

The Martin County Sheriff’s Office said officials received calls on Sunday, February 21 of a “distressed vessel” trying to reach the shore in St. Lucie County. While on their way to the scene, a wave hit the vessel causing it to capsize.

Authorities and civilians helped rescued the six men and two pregnant women, the sheriff’s office said, adding they were taken to the hospital and are in stable condition.

“Federal authorities will now determine if any further immigration action will be taken,” the office wrote on their Facebook page.

Continue Reading
Advertisement
Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Living

Vaccine passports not for the jetset, says WHO

Published

on

By

Vaccine passports not for the jetset, says WHO

No need to pull your suitcase and neck pillow from storage just yet.

In light of hype and rumor surrounding the so-called “vaccine passport,” the World Health Organization has issued a statement warning transportation officials that such clearances would not guarantee travelers are immune from spreading COVID-19 in one way or another.

Proof of immunization would be a moot requirement, as there are still more “critical unknowns regarding the efficacy of vaccination in reducing transmission,” WHO asserted.

“WHO also recommends that people who are vaccinated should not be exempt from complying with other travel risk-reduction measures,” they wrote in a Feb. 5 statement about the proposed digital passports that show a person has been vaccinated.

They also discouraged the possibility that cautious international travelers might put a squeeze on already scarce coronavirus vaccine doses, putting disadvantaged groups at a continued risk of exposure — and extend their period of lockdown isolation.

“Individuals who do not have access to an authorized COVID-19 vaccine would be unfairly impeded in their freedom of movement if proof of vaccination status became a condition for entry to or exit from a country,” WHO wrote. “National authorities should choose public health interventions that least infringe on individual freedom of movement.”

The US, UK and other European leaders have publicly mulled safe travel programs and strategies that would pave the way for a travel industry rehab, allowing greater mobility between countries in the wake of a pandemic which has seen over 2.5 million lives lost globally since last winter. In addition to international travel, the license might potentially allow for access to bars and restaurants.

Public health experts outside of WHO’s ranks have also criticized the proposition.

“I can see that they might be useful in the longer term, but I have several concerns about them being considered at this point in time when I think the scientific evidence doesn’t support them. And there are lots of ethical concerns about them that I think are legitimate,” said Dr. Deepti Gurdasani, clinical epidemiologist at Queen Mary University of London, according to a CNBC report on Thursday.

“We know very little about the effectiveness of vaccines in preventing infection or even asymptomatic disease against several variants circulating in different countries,” Dr. Gurdasani added.

The statements come at a time when scientists are learning more than ever about the enigmatic disease, including a study reported on Wednesday which revealed that the coronavirus can survive on fabric, including cotton and polyester blends, for up to three days — removed only with scorching hot water and detergent.

Continue Reading

Living

Amid COVID-19 pandemic, flu has disappeared in the US

Published

on

By

Amid COVID-19 pandemic, flu has disappeared in the US

NEW YORK — February is usually the peak of flu season, with doctors’ offices and hospitals packed with suffering patients. But not this year.

Flu has virtually disappeared from the U.S., with reports coming in at far lower levels than anything seen in decades.

Experts say that measures put in place to fend off the coronavirus — mask wearing, social distancing and virtual schooling — were a big factor in preventing a “twindemic” of flu and COVID-19. A push to get more people vaccinated against flu probably helped, too, as did fewer people traveling, they say.

Another possible explanation: The coronavirus has essentially muscled aside flu and other bugs that are more common in the fall and winter. Scientists don’t fully understand the mechanism behind that, but it would be consistent with patterns seen when certain flu strains predominate over others, said Dr. Arnold Monto, a flu expert at the University of Michigan.

Nationally, “this is the lowest flu season we’ve had on record,” according to a surveillance system that is about 25 years old, said Lynnette Brammer of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Continue Reading

Living

26,000 people applied to move to Arkansas and get $10,000

Published

on

By

26,000 people applied to move to Arkansas and get $10,000

If you’ve ever thought about a move to the Ozarks, you’re not alone.

More than 26,000 people have applied for a program that will pay them to move to northwest Arkansas.

The Northwest Arkansas Council’s “Life Works Here” program is offering the money to remote workers willing to move to the region, Fox News previously reported. The program will also provide the new residents with a bicycle to enjoy the region’s miles of trails or a membership to a local art or cultural institution.

The program has already selected its first 25 recipients, it announced this week. They include an executive chef and James Beard Foundation Impact Fellow from Atlanta, a digital marketing manager from Denver, a music producer and “creative community curator” from Los Angeles, a gaming producer from Los Angeles and a cloud technology manager from San Francisco, according to the announcement.

“This first wave of new talent to the northwest Arkansas region generated by the ‘Life Works Here’ campaign is just a sampling of the exceptional individuals we’ve been able to attract to our region with the incentive program,” Northwest Arkansas Council CEO Nelson Peacock said in a press release.

Peacock said the group had been “overwhelmed by the unbelievable response.” The applicants included people from all 50 states and more than 115 countries.

“This program is not only a benefit to the recipients and new talent for our region, but it also contributes to the vibrancy of our existing, growing market and our local economy,” he said.

The program launched last November, thanks to support from the Walton Family Foundation. It had $1 million to offer to new residents and the program is still accepting applicants.

“Professionals all over the country are starting to see the benefits of life in the Heartland and Bentonville and Northwest Arkansas are at the top of the list,” Steuart Walton said in a press release. “This region welcomes innovators and thought leaders to a community defined by world-class biking, cultural experiences and a true entrepreneurial spirit.”

The area isn’t just known for its recreation opportunities. It’s also home to the headquarters of major businesses like Walmart, Tyson Foods and J.B. Hunt Transport Services.

To qualify for the program, one needs to be able to move within six months, sign a lease for local housing or buy a home, be 24 or older, have at least two years of work experience and be employed full time. Candidates must also be US citizens or be able to work legally in the US and currently live outside Arkansas.

Ideal candidates will also be STEAM professionals or entrepreneurs, according to the program’s website. And they’re looking for people “who will add to the vibrancy of our community.”

The announcement comes the same week that a similar program in Tulsa, Oklahoma announced that it was renewing itself and offering $10,000 up front for new residents who buy a home in the city. Previously, the Tulsa Remote program had only paid out the money in installments over the course of a year.

Continue Reading

Trending