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Knicks, Nerlens Noel pass Mitchell Robinson test vs. Hawks

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Knicks, Nerlens Noel pass Mitchell Robinson test vs. Hawks

The Knicks were already missing center Mitchell Robinson, who may undergo hand surgery this week.

Their new starting center Nerlens Noel picked up three early fouls. Backup center Taj Gibson got tagged with four fouls in the second quarter.

Atlanta took 25 free throws in the first half. Knicks coach Tom Thibodeau went briefly with his alternate plan of using Julius Randle at center and rookie Obi Toppin at power forward.

It’s not an ideal formation, especially against Atlanta center Clint Capela, who finished with 15 points and 18 rebounds.

Fortunately for the Knicks, Noel returned to put forth a grinding second half amid massive foul trouble as the Knicks moved to 2-0 since Robinson’s injury.

In the third quarter, the Hawks raced to a 72-66 lead before the Knicks staged a 23-11 run. It was a run Noel helped ignite when he made two straight blocks — one on Skylar Mays, the other on Kevin Huerter, the Albany-area native who struggled mightily (2 of 12).

“I was concerned,’’ Thibodeau said of his centers’ foul trouble. “We talked about the way they draw fouls. It was called tight and we had to adjust. I thought Nerlens was terrific. It’s not an easy matchup.’’

The box score for Noel doesn’t necessarily sparkle, but he did all the gritty defensive work that allowed the Knicks to pull through. And he did so playing through five fouls, picking up his fifth with 8:36 left.

Noel scored six points (3 of 3 from the field), adding three blocks, two steals and four rebounds, finishing a plus-17 in 27 minutes.

Gibson scored just one point in 16 minutes but was gritty on a night Toppin was mostly a nonfactor in 11 minutes.

The Hawks’ Trae Young-led attack was stymied in the 28-22 fourth quarter.

“The pick-and-roll coverage is huge when you play that team,’’ Thibodeau said. “You have to commit to the ball and commit to getting back, commit to rebounding. It requires great effort. You can’t relax a second. Capela puts pressure on you, [John] Collins puts pressure on you and Young is a load to deal with. Those guys looked at a lot of pick-and-rolls. Some we defended extremely well. Some not as well as we liked. But we had a great effort from both centers.’’

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Donald Douglas, longtime PSAL executive director, dead at 58

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Donald Douglas, longtime PSAL executive director, dead at 58

Donald Douglas, the longtime executive director of the Public School Athletic League, died late Friday night, according to friend and PSAL colleague Dwayne Burnett.

Douglas was 58, according to his Facebook page.

Douglas died of a heart attack, while vacationing on the island of Jamaica, after a bad fall eventually caused a blood clot to form, according to Burnett. The Brooklyn native and Bushwick High School alum had retired this week from his post. He was PSAL director since 2004, when he was promoted from deputy director, and spent more than 35 years working for the New York City Department of Education.

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Don’t make this catcher mistake

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Don’t make this catcher mistake

The 2021 fantasy baseball draft season is upon us, and with its arrival comes a variety of strategies to test out and employ.

Drafting with position scarcity in mind is something we see every year, and though the catcher position is routinely linked to the strategy, the belief that you need to draft one of the top backstops early is a mistake. If you have been leaning in that direction, it’s time to change gears before you fall over.

In fantasy football, position scarcity has people drafting No. 1-ranked tight end Travis Kelce early because, in securing him, you are obtaining a significant advantage over your opposition. His production dwarfs that of anyone else at his position and on a 10-man roster in a weekly matchup, the impact is huge. The same cannot be said regarding the No. 1 catcher, J.T. Realmuto.

There is plenty to love about Realmuto from a fantasy perspective. His three-year average has him as a .273 hitter with 25 home runs and 81 RBIs. The numbers are strong, but does drafting him in the fourth or fifth round over a 40-homer Pete Alonso or a 200-strikeout Lance Lynn still give you an advantage? Not when you understand it’s just one-fourteenth of your overall team production or when you see what you can get at the position several rounds later.

Casting aside 2020 data, we can look at a number of backstops who not only hit 20 or more home runs, but also hit .270 or better in 2019 and can be obtained at a much lower cost. Willson Contreras, Mitch Garver, Christian Vazquez and Omar Narvaez immediately stand out.

JT Realmuto
JT Realmuto
Getty Images

You also have players such as Yasmani Grandal and Roberto Perez, who matched the power, but fell short on the batting average, or James McCann and Travis d’Arnaud, who posted strong averages, but hit for slightly less power. That’s already eight players who can provide similar numbers at a fraction of the cost, and we’re just scratching the surface.

If Realmuto was a .300-30-100 player, the conversation would certainly be different. He’s a great player but he isn’t performing at a level that leaves your opposition in the dust. If his production can be matched 10 rounds later, you’re better off using that early pick on an elite arm or a bigger bat at another position. Leave your catchers for later.

Howard Bender is the VP of operations and head of content at FantasyAlarm.com. Follow him on Twitter @rotobuzzguy and catch him on the award-winning “Fantasy Alarm Radio Show” on the SiriusXM fantasy sports channel weekdays from 6-8 p.m. Go to FantasyAlarm.com for all your fantasy football advice.

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Mets star Pete Alonso opens up on why he quit social media

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Mets star Pete Alonso opens up on why he quit social media

PORT ST. LUCIE — Pete Alonso wasn’t the only big voice in the Mets organization to deactivate his social media accounts over the offseason.

But the first baseman going dark on Twitter and Instagram had nothing to do with the aftermath of a stock market saga, which was the reason owner Steve Cohen ditched Twitter, and everything to do with a new outlook on life away from a screen.

“I think that real life is just absolutely fantastic and for me, I think life is a blessing, it’s something that I feel like a lot of people, sometimes including myself, take for granted,” Alonso said Friday after a workout. “And I want to spend every second soaking in every single day because every single new day is a blessing, and I feel like especially in wake of what happened last year, there’s a lot of things that I feel like were taken for granted.

“In 2019, if you see everybody wearing this mask, you kind of scratch your head and just be like, ‘Whoa, what’s going on?’ But there’s a lot of new social norms that are in place now that we took for granted. I think for me, I just want to be appreciative of every single day. I want to live in real life.”

Alonso had been one of the more active Mets interacting with fans through social media, especially during his Rookie of the Year season in 2019, when he adopted “#LFGM” as the team’s new rallying cry.

Though he will no longer be in touch with fans online, Alonso is very much looking forward to welcoming them back in person at Citi Field this season. After playing at an empty stadium in 2020 because of COVID-19 restrictions, the Mets are expected to have at least a portion of Citi Field open to fans when the 2021 season begins.

“Playing on TV is absolutely fantastic, but being there in person where one swing of the bat or making a diving play or striking somebody out, you can make that many people in person smile, stand, clap, cheer, yell even just by doing something,” Alonso said, with a big smile breaking out. “Once I heard 40,000 people at Citi Field go absolutely bonkers, that’s an adrenaline rush that I’m addicted to.

“I can’t wait until it’s packed out again like that. If it’s 25 percent, 30 percent, I can’t wait to hear people cheer again in person. For me, it’s addicting, and I love it.”

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