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Harley-Davidson to make LiveWire a standalone brand

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Harley-Davidson LiveWire charging at Electrify America charging station

The Harley-Davidson LiveWire electric motorcycle will spawn a standalone all-electric brand, the company announced Monday in a press release. The first LiveWire-branded motorcycle will be unveiled July 8, ahead of the International Motorcycle Show, the company said.

That marks a departure from the initial Harley-Davidson LiveWire, which was launched in 2019 as a single model within the Harley brand. It’s similar to the progression of Hyundai’s Genesis and Ioniq nameplates, which started out as individual models within the Hyundai brand, before expanding to standalone brands.

LiveWire will be “headquartered virtually,” with staff located in Silicon Valley and Milwaukee, according to Harley. The new brand will get its own engineering team dedicated to electric powertrains, but will also lean on Harley’s existing resources for engineering and manufacturing (the current Harley-Davidson LiveWire is built at the same York, Pennsylvania, factory as other bikes).

Harley-Davidson LiveWire charging at Electrify America charging station

Harley is also planning dedicated LiveWire showrooms, starting in California. However, the company also said LiveWire “will work with participating dealers from the Harley-Davidson network as an independent brand” and will “blend digital and physical retail formats,” indicating online sales may be a possibility.

Unveiled at the 2019 Consumer Electronics Show, the initial Harley-Davidson LiveWire sports a 110-mile range and 0-60 mph acceleration of 3.5 seconds. It hit the market in late 2019 with a $29,799 base price (before destination), which typically buys a higher-tier gasoline bike.

Several dedicated companies have launched electric motorcycles, but Harley is the only legacy manufacturer to wade in so far in the U.S. Polaris bought electric-motorcycle firm Brammo in 2015, and has a partnership with Zero Motorcycles, but so far it’s only discussed electric ATVs. Honda, Kawasaki, Suzuki, and Yamaha are working to develop a standardized swappable battery system for the Japanese market.

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Autos

Ford Shelby Cobra concept headed to Monterey auction

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Carroll Shelby and the 2004 Ford Shelby Cobra concept (Photo via Mecum Auctions)

The 2004 Ford Shelby Cobra concept is headed to auction. The one-off drivable concept car inspired by the legendary Cobra roadster will cross the block at Mecum auction in Monterey, California, scheduled for Aug. 12-14.

Codenamed “Daisy,” the Shelby Cobra concept debuted at the 2004 Detroit auto show. Since 2017, it’s been owned by Chris Theodore, one of the designers who worked on it.

This concept was a product of the retro craze that swept the auto industry in the 1990s and early 2000s. Ford had already launched a new Thunderbird with retro styling by the time the Cobra concept debuted. Ford subsequently launched versions of the GT and Mustang with styling inspired by their 1960s predecessors. Ford also built the Shelby GR1 concept in 2004 as a modern take on the Shelby Daytona Coupe race cars of the 1960s.

Carroll Shelby and the 2004 Ford Shelby Cobra concept (Photo via Mecum Auctions)

Unlike most concept cars, the Cobra is fully drivable. It’s powered by a 6.4-liter V-10, which, like the car itself, never made it to production. Other components were sourced from the Ford GT, which was undergoing development at the time.

Cobra creator Carroll Shelby gave the project his blessing, and drove the car for publicity photos (even doing some donuts), but he likely didn’t have much engineering input. Shelby’s involvement was symbolically important, though, as this marked the first time he’d worked with Ford since the glory days of the original Cobra in the 1960s.

Theodore paid $825,000 for the Cobra in 2017. Mecum doesn’t provide pre-auction estimates, but when Theodore and the Cobra appeared on Jay Leno’s Garage recently, car appraiser Donald Osborne said the Cobra was worth $1.5 million. The car isn’t street legal, however, and the auction listing notes that it must be sold to an out-of-state buyer, likely because of California emissions rules.

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2021 Ferrari 812 GTS prances into Jay Leno’s Garage

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2021 Ferrari 812 GTS on Jay Leno's Garage

After checking out the mid-engine Ferrari SF90 Stradale, Jay Leno switched to the front-engine 812 GTS for a recent episode of “Jay Leno’s Garage.”

The Ferrari 812 GTS is a convertible version of the 812 Superfast, sporting a retractable hardtop in place of the Superfast’s fixed roof. So it’s perfect for Leno’s Los Angeles locale.

Like the 812 Superfast, the 812 GTS is powered by a naturally-aspirated 6.5-liter V-12, producing 789 hp and 530 lb-ft of torque. The engine drives the rear wheels through a 7-speed dual-clutch transmission. Ferrari quotes 0-62 mph in less than three seconds, with a top speed of over 211 mph.

2021 Ferrari 812 GTS on Jay Leno’s Garage

When it was unveiled in 2019, the 812 GTS was the first V-12 Ferrari convertible since 2014’s limited-edition F60 America. In terms of regular production cars, it was the first since the 365 GTS/4 Daytona Spider of the early 1970s. However, Ferrari has since unveiled the 812 Competizione A, a more hardcore targa version with 812 hp.

Leno was impressed by the design, noting that the V-12 front-engine cars are Ferrari’s traditional bailiwick. He liked the driving dynamics too, praising the smoothness of the V-12, the comfortable ride, and the handling precision of what is a fairly large car. A four-wheel steering system, shared with the 812 Superfast and originally from the F12tdf, likely helps with that.

A hardcore version of the 812 Superfast is expected to be a swan song for the naturally-aspirated Ferrari V-12. So watch Leno take the 812 GTS for a spin, and listen to that V-12 wail.

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2022 Toyota Tundra first look

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2022 Toyota Tundra leaked via Tundra.com forum

Update: This story has been updated after Toyota released an official image of the 2022 Toyota Tundra

The new generation of the Toyota Tundra is finally coming after more than a decade, and now the wait to see the new full-size truck appears to be over.

On Thursday, Tundras.com forum member Tibetan Nomad posted leaked images of the 2022 Toyota Tundra, which were reportedly posted on the TundraCrew Facebook group by a dealership employee. Toyota responded by releasing a single photo of the new truck.

Given the lighting and background, the images appear to be screen shots of official press images or of an in-studio video walk around.

Based on the wheels and wording stamped into the tailgate, the 2022 Toyota Tundra pictured is the off-road-oriented TRD Pro model.

2022 Toyota Tundra leaked via Tundra.com forum

We’ve seen earlier teaser images, so there aren’t a ton of surprises in the front end design. In the images, we see LED lighting, amber marker lights, a driving light in the grille right below the word Toyota, and fog lights at the bottom of the grille. The back of the bulging hood features the trim name, in this case TRD Pro.

Black, presumably aluminum, wheels are wrapped in Falken Wildpeak all-terrain tires.

2022 Toyota Tundra leaked via Tundra.com forum

2022 Toyota Tundra leaked via Tundra.com forum

The rear tailgate has TRD Pro stamped into it with three amber LED marker lights above the release handle. Vertical LED taillights have dual lighting elements.

The next-generation Tundra is expected to ride on a new modular truck platform that will also underpin the next-generation Tacoma, 4Runner, and Sequoia.

The current Tundra’s 5.7-liter V-8 will likely be retired with the redesign. A new twin-turbo V-6 is expected to power the 2022 Tundra with a hybrid version as an option.

Stay tuned for more on the 2022 Toyota Tundra.

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