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Georgia veteran loses beloved cane, but finds American patriotism

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Georgia veteran loses beloved cane, but finds American patriotism

A Georgia Army veteran is heartbroken after losing the hand-carved wooden cane that’s helped her walk since her leg was injured in 2010 during combat in Afghanistan — but now her whole community is helping her find it again.

Army Sgt. Kendra Lou Pieper lost her left leg above the knee after being hurt by an improvised explosive device in Afghanistan in 2010. The cane was imprinted with her service record and medals.

So when the cane went missing after she accidentally left it at a gas station this week, Pieper felt she’d lost a lot more than a walking stick.

“I was given this cane shortly after I lost my leg. Every fine detail was hand carved & colored. It has my rank/name on it, and each of my military badges,” she said.

“It also has my Purple Heart medal, and the Fallen Soldier Battle Cross. It says ‘Ripcord’ because that was our call sign down range,” she wrote in a Facebook post which has now been shared 600,000 times.

Her fiance returned to the gas station to try to find the cane, but it wasn’t there. Security footage showed a white suburban which pulled up behind her and took the cane, she told the Atlanta Journal-Constitution.

“I don’t care who, what, where, when, or why. I just want my cane back. I feel that my cane told my story without me saying a word. It answered people’s questions without them having to ask,” she said in the Facebook post, adding, “…This cane was made for me. Please, I just want my cane retuned back to me or the store it was taken from.”

Now the local sheriff has opened an investigation, which should make it easier to track down who might have taken the cane. And Pieper says she’s been moved by the support her story has gotten.

“I just really want to tell everyone, ‘thank you,’” Pieper told the AJC. “It’s been so amazing to see how many people truly care. And how patriotic America still is. So, I definitely want to tell the people, ‘thank you for caring.’”

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2-year-old boy shoots parents in Maine home

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2-year-old boy shoots parents in Maine home

A 2-year-old boy in Maine shot his parents Wednesday morning with a gun he picked up from a nightstand, a report said.

The toddler’s 25-year-old father was hit in the head, and the mother, 22, was struck in the leg in the shooting at their home in West Bath, WMTW reported, citing Sagadahoc County Sheriff Joel Merry.

The baby was injured by the recoil of the gun, authorities said. All three family members were hospitalized with non-life threatening injuries, according to Merry.

“The question of how the boy was able to pick up and fire the weapon is of great concern and is being investigated,” Merry said, according to the report.

“This situation, while disturbing, could have had an even more tragic ending,” the sheriff said.

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Banksy’s ‘Love is in the Air’ auctioned for $12.9M in crypto

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Banksy's 'Love is in the Air' auctioned for $12.9M in crypto

A Banksy piece fetched $12.9 million in an auction Tuesday — and the winning bidder will pay for the pricey pop art with cryptocurrency.

The anonymous artist’s “Love is in the Air” is the first physical piece of art sold by a major auction house paid for using crypto, according to a tweet from Sotheby’s.

The protest image — which shows a protester winding up with a bouquet of flowers in hand instead of a molotov cocktail — was sold after a 14-minute bidding battle with four participants, Sotheby’s said.

The auction house announced in March it would auction off a series of non-fungible tokens, or NFTs, which are digital assets that represent ownership of virtual items like art and sports memorabilia.

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Colonial Pipeline has restarted operations after cyberattack

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Colonial Pipeline has restarted operations after cyberattack

Colonial Pipeline restarted operations on Wednesday — after it was shut down for days over a cyberattack, causing major disruptions and panic-buying at gas stations across the Southeast.

The company said it “initiated the restart of the pipeline” — which delivers about 45 percent of the fuel consumed on the East Coast — at around 5 p.m..

“Following this restart, it will take several days for the product delivery supply chain to return to normal,” Colonial’s statement said.

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