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Fukushima surfer, shop owner alarmed at water release plan

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Fukushima surfer, shop owner alarmed at water release plan, fears ‘contaminated sea’

Koji Suzuki’s surf shop, which he first opened in 1989, was washed away by the devastating tsunami that hit northeast Japan in March 2011. But that did not kill his love of the sea.

The 66-year-old reopened Sun Marine Surf in November of the following year in a new location in Minamisoma city, a few kilometers from the coast and he visits the beaches of Fukushima Prefecture daily to surf.

So he takes personally Japan’s decision to release nearly 1.3 million tonnes of treated water into the sea from the nearby Fukushima nuclear plant, which was severely damaged by the same tsunami and the earthquake that unleashed it. 

“I definitely do not want to be in a contaminated sea and I am completely against the government’s decision”, said Suzuki after riding the waves on Friday morning.

The first release of water from the plant will take place in about two years, giving operator Tokyo Electric Power time to filter it to remove harmful isotopes, build infrastructure and get approval from regulators.

Japan has said the release is necessary to press ahead with the complex decommissioning of the Fukushima Daiichi plant. It also says similarly treated water is released from nuclear plants around the world.

Koji Suzuki, 66, a surfer and a surf shop owner, works at his shop in Minamisoma, Fukushima Prefecture, Japan, April 16, 2021.
Suzuki works at his shop in Minamisoma, Fukushima Prefecture, Japan.
Reuters

Suzuki said he knows the government insists the treated water will be safe, but he is concerned others may not think so.

“I was hoping that the number (of visitors) will recover to pre-disaster levels, but now it’s decided that treated water will be released into the sea. I’m worried that the figure may fall again,” he said.

The first of Fukushima’s beaches did not reopen to the public until several years after the disaster following a huge decontamination effort, with Kitaizumi beach, 22 km (14 miles) north of the plant, not reopening until July 2019.

Suzuki, who tends to surf at a different beach further away from Fukushima Daiichi, says numbers visiting the area have picked up again. But he is afraid the central government’s decision will end up impacting the local marine sports industry, including surfing.

“I don’t think anyone wants to surf at contaminated beaches,” Suzuki said.

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Snorkeler finds wedding ring stuck on fish

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Snorkeler finds wedding ring stuck on fish

It looks like somebody just made some random fish the happiest fish in the world.

A snorkeler recently shared an unusual discovery she made during a recent trip underwater. According to her, it’s not uncommon to see certain types of fish with various pieces of garbage stuck around their necks.

Recently, however, she came across a fish that was wearing a wedding ring.

Susan Prior was snorkeling in Emily Bay, which is located on an island off the eastern coast of Australia, People reports. According to the environmental conservationist, she came across a sand mullet that had a gold ring around its neck.

According to the snorkeler, sand mullets sort through the sand while looking for food. It’s possible that this particular fish swam through the ring and got it stuck on its body.

It wasn’t until Prior returned to land, however, that she remembered a post on the community social media page. Apparently, a man had recently lost his wedding ring in the same area.

She was reportedly able to get in touch with the man and they both believe that it’s likely that this fish is swimming around with the man’s missing wedding ring.

Apparently, Prior is willing to try and relocate the fish and, along with a group of fishermen, attempt to catch it with a net. Then, she’d likely be able to remove the ring and return it to its owner. She reportedly described this as “difficult,” so there’s no guarantee that it will work.

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Florida fisherman chased by 11-foot alligator in scary video

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Florida fisherman chased by 11-foot alligator in scary video

A Florida fisherman became the bait when he was chased by an alligator in the Everglades.

GoPro video captured the near-death experience when Tommy Lee was tarpon fishing on May 8.

The 22-year-old was recording himself fishing at sunrise when an 11-foot bull alligator swam onshore. As Lee backed up, the reptile chased him through the brush, getting too close for comfort.

It “stalked me then chased me,” he told ViralHog. “The gator appeared much larger and closer in person. It got within 10 feet of me.”

At one heart-pounding moment, Lee tripped and fell to the ground, but quickly regained his footing and continued to back up.

In the two-minute video, you can hear the frazzled fisherman exclaiming, “Jesus Christ. You gotta be careful here.” But as he lost sight of the deadly creature, he retraced his steps following the animal until it splashed back in the water.

“And I am out of here,” Lee said to himself before grabbing his gear and turning off the camera.

Lee uploaded the shocking clip to his YouTube channel, Chum Dumpster, where it amassed 1.2 million views.

However, it isn’t too surprising that the sharp-toothed creature came out to play. May and June mark mating season for the more than one million alligators that live in Florida.

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KFC hackers jailed in China over $31,000 worth of chicken

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KFC hackers jailed in China over $31,000 worth of chicken

The Chinese students who scored a five-finger-lickin’ discount at Kentucky Fried Chicken — for a total of $31,000 worth of food — are going to prison.

Their scam took place in 2018 after one of them discovered a glitch on KFC’s online order platform, allowing them access to an endless supply of fried chicken.

The five college con artists involved in the grift were handed down a range of sentences by the People’s Court of Xuhui District in Shanghai, from 13 to 30 months, according to Daily Mail and recent Chinese-language reports, with fines set between $150 (1,000 yuan) and $900 (6,000 yuan).

“Being fully aware of this bug, the convicted deliberately engaged in false transactions and illegally profited from them, which constituted the crime of fraud,” court papers read, according to Australia’s 9News.

The group’s 23-year-old ringleader, identified only as “Xu,” defrauded the company out of some $9,000 (58,000 yuan). All told, they stole more than $31,000 (129,000 yuan) worth of food from Yum! Brands, which owns the KFC name.

The simple scheme involved a loophole between KFC’s app and the restaurant’s page on Chinese social network WeChat, which allowed Xu to use a voucher for free food while also being refunded. It’s been reported that Xu later began shilling out the free food he’d reaped as a side hustle.

The case has reportedly sparked debate online, according to Global Times, with some saying that a bug in KFC’s order system is on the corporation — not the customers who reaped the spoils of their mistake.

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