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Famed medieval Bayeux Tapestry goes online, every thread

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Famed medieval Bayeux Tapestry goes online, every thread

PARIS — The world-famous medieval Bayeux Tapestry may be off-limits to visitors because of the coronavirus pandemic, but its keepers have put a digital version online so the public can enjoy its fabled cloth from the safety of home.

At nearly 77 yards long, users may have to be skilled at using the scroll function of their computers.

The resolution is so clear in the online panorama that you can see the fibers of each stitch when you zoom in.

The Bayeux Tapestry is thought to date to the 11th century, and depicts events leading up to the Norman conquest of England, bringing the era to life in vivid — and sometimes bloody — detail.

Despite being so old, it has shown relatively little decomposition. However, a plan to fix wear and tear in its storytelling weave has been put in place in a planned 2024 restoration by the museum that houses it in the Normandy town of Bayeux.

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Some Australian states ease curbs on dancing after weeks of no COVID cases

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Some Australian states ease curbs on dancing after weeks of no COVID cases

SYDNEY – Two Australian states will loosen restrictions on dancing at indoor venues and ease other curbs from Friday after several weeks of no COVID-19 cases.

In New South Wales (NSW), 30 people will be allowed to dance at weddings and as many as 30 people will be able to sing indoors together, up from five currently. Households will also be allowed to host 50 guests, up from 30.

The move comes after the state, which accounts for a third of Australia’s population of 25 million, logged no locally acquired infections for a 38th straight day on Wednesday and as the country entered its third day of a nationwide vaccination programme.

“With the rollout of the vaccine now underway and no new locally acquired cases in NSW, we are able to make further changes towards a new COVID normal,” state Premier Gladys Berejiklian told reporters.

Restrictions are also being eased in South Australia from Friday. Dancing will be now allowed at smaller venues with capacity of less than 200 people, while at bigger venues, 50 can dance at a time at a designated area. The state will also drop testing requirements for visitors from Melbourne, which had previously been a COVID-19 hotspot.

Although there have been cases among returning citizens from abroad, Australia has largely contained community transmission of the virus with speedy contact tracing, mandatory mask-wearing on public transport and snap lockdowns.

It has recorded just under 29,000 COVID-19 cases and 909 deaths since the pandemic began.

The nationwide immunisation drive has seen some incorrect dosages after two elderly people were inadvertently given four times the recommended dose of the Pfizer Inc COVID-19 vaccine.

“Both patients are being monitored and both are showing no signs at all of an adverse reaction but it is a reminder of the importance of the safeguards,” Health Minister Greg Hunt told reporters in Canberra.

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Woman regrets very unfortunate tattoo she got pre-pandemic

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Woman regrets very unfortunate tattoo she got pre-pandemic

She wishes she could “mask” this permanent pandemic fail.

A TikTok user was asked what the “dumbest” tattoo she’s ever gotten, and it turns out the ink that had a profound meaning to her before COVID-19 struck is something she now regrets.

“So I got this tattoo — I’ve wanted it for a couple of years — it basically means being, like, true to yourself and real and not pretending to be something you’re not,” TikTok user @wakaflockafloccar explained in a now-viral video.

The unfortunate tat, which she got in March just before the coronavirus swept the world, reads: “Courageous and radically, refuse to wear a mask.”

She ends the clip by giving a sarcastic two thumbs up, and commenting: “I could NOT have had worse timing. P.S. I’m not anti-mask I promise.”

The post, which has now been viewed nearly 1.5 million times, garnered plenty of critical comments, including one user who asked what she plans to do now that the inking makes her seem anti-mask.

“Are you going to get it removed? Do people think you’re an anti-masker? Are you embarrassed by it? I need to know,” asked the TikToker.

“I wore long sleeves all last year so no one would see it,” she answered.

This embarrassing tat isn’t the only one that has the internet with jaws dropped recently.

An Aussie woman who said she often struggles to remember her “right” from her “left” got an “L” and an “R” tatted on her thumbs so she’d never forget again.

The photo immediately went viral, garnering over 4,000 likes in less than 24 hours.

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NYU launching $10M Center for Psychedelic Medicine in Manhattan

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NYU launching $10M Center for Psychedelic Medicine in Manhattan

New York University wants to expand our minds — but in a trippy new way.

NYU Langone Health’s Department of Psychiatry plans to establish a Center for Psychedelic Medicine, a hallucinatory hub that will support research on treating addiction, chronic pain, opioid addiction and “existential distress” — among other physical and emotional maladies — using psychedelics. NYU researchers are already involved in studies on the treatment of alcoholism, anxiety and major depressive disorder with psilocybin (the active ingredient in magic mushrooms) and the treatment of severe PTSD with MDMA (also known as ecstasy and molly).

The program, announced Wednesday, will also be the home base for NYU’s new Psychedelic Medicine Research Training Program, which will attempt to make psychedelic medicine more mainstream and increase the number of experts in the field.

The new facility is backed by $10 million from donors, including Dr. Bronner’s soaps and psychedelic medicine company MindMed. 

The center is being created to “ensure that the momentum created by the modern psychedelic renaissance is sustained,” according to NYU psychiatry professor Michael P. Bogenschutz, who will be the center’s director. 

Benefactors believe the program will not only advance psychedelic-inspired medicinal research, but also help those suffering from “some of the most prevalent issues in mental health for patients,” according to a press release, which added, “We are very excited about what the future holds.”

The center comes amid a surge in medicinal interest in psychedelics, with Oregon becoming the first state to legalize magic mushrooms in November, and California currently considering a bill that would decriminalize acid. Last August, a guided ketamine trip therapy clinic opened in Manhattan. 

Recreationally, psychedelics appear to be more popular than ever: In a July 2020 study, researchers found that LSD has become exponentially more popular among American adults as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic.

“LSD is used primarily to escape. And given that the world’s on fire, people might be using it as a therapeutic mechanism,” University of Cincinnati doctoral candidate Andrew Yockey told Scientific American at the time. “Now that COVID’s hit, I’d guess that use has probably tripled.”

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