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Facebook reducing distribution of Myanmar military content

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Facebook reducing distribution of Myanmar military content

Facebook said on Friday it would reduce the distribution of all content and profiles run by Myanmar’s military, saying they have “continued to spread misinformation” after the army seized power and detained civilian leaders in a coup on Feb. 1.

The measures – which are not a ban, but are aimed at reducing the number of people who see the content – will apply to an official page run by the army and one by a spokesperson, the company said in a statement, as well as “any additional pages that the military controls that repeatedly violate our misinformation policies”.

The pages will also not appear on newsfeeds as “recommended”.

The social media giant said it had also suspended the ability for Myanmar government agencies to send content-removal requests to Facebook through the normal channels used by authorities across the world.

“Simultaneously, we are protecting content, including political speech, that allows the people of Myanmar to express themselves and to show the world what is transpiring inside their country,” said Rafael Frankel, director of public policy, APAC emerging countries.

Hundreds of thousands of people have been protesting across Myanmar since the army overthrew the civilian government led by Aung San Suu Kyi and detained most top leaders.

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Parler scraps Amazon antitrust lawsuit after relaunching

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Parler scraps Amazon antitrust lawsuit after relaunching

Parler has dropped the antitrust lawsuit it brought against Amazon after the tech titan booted the right-wing social network from its servers.

In a three-page court filing, Parler said it was voluntarily dismissing its scathing January complaint accusing Amazon’s cloud computing unit of forcing its website offline out of “political animus.”

Parler walked away from the case “without prejudice,” meaning it reserves the right to re-file the lawsuit in the future, according to the Tuesday filing.

The startup did not explain why it decided to scrap the suit. But the filing came about two weeks after Parler relaunched its free-speech-focused platform, which has become popular with supporters of ex-President Donald Trump and other right-wing activists.

Amazon Web Services, or AWS, said it severed ties with Parler because of the platform failed to police threats of violence by users in the wake of the Jan. 6 pro-Trump riots at the US Capitol.

The move forced Parler offline for about a month until it found a new host for its website. The Nevada-based firm came out with guns blazing in response, accusing Amazon in its lawsuit of silencing Parler to protect Twitter — another AWS customer that had banned Trump days earlier — from a growing rival.

AWS called Parler’s claims meritless and said the firm repeatedly ignored its requests to remove violent content, including death threats against public figures.

Parler walked away from the court battle following a period of internal turmoil. The company’s board ousted founder John Matze as CEO in late January and replaced him with interim chief Mark Meckler, a longtime conservative activist.

Neither Parler nor Amazon immediately responded to requests for comment Wednesday.

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Twitch gamer Sodapoppin quits fake GTA jobs: ‘It’s too much’

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Twitch gamer Sodapoppin quits fake GTA jobs: 'It’s too much'

Sometimes being a fake fast-food restaurant manager can be as taxing as being a real one.

This is especially true when you also have pretend side gigs managing a virtual casino and a vineyard while engaging in a wide range of criminal activities and violent altercations – including bribing law enforcement and fighting aliens who want to control your mind — that exist only in the all-consuming Grand Theft Auto (GTA for short) role-playing game.

The multitasking streamer in question, Chance “Sodapoppin” Morris, whose game-name is Kevin Whipaloo, announced Sunday that he is quitting his fake jobs and forsaking his imaginary life of crime.

“It got overwhelming to the point I don’t enjoy it anymore,” the 27-year-old said via livestream on Twitch, a streaming platform made popular by gamers. “I overestimated myself, and I don’t like it anymore.”

To those in the GTA world, Sodapoppin’s departure is a big deal. He has an enormous online presence thanks to his over-the-top personality, mad gaming skills and a willingness to do stupid things (twerking, being bullied by his dog, peeing on himself and getting yelled at by his dad, and writing all over his face with a Sharpie). There are 570,000 Twitter followers who hang on his every post. He has one of the largest Twitch fan bases out there — 6.2 million strong, with some 350 million views — and his YouTube channel subscribers top 1 million.

He made a name for himself as a topflight World of Warcraft player who began streaming his play on Twitch in 2012. Then, he showed off his blackjack prowess (or lack thereof) by gambling via online casinos and once dropping $5,000 on one hand as 43,000 fans stood witness through Twitch. Most recently, he handled his array of Grand Theft jobs and cackled his way through role-playing sessions on Twitch.

The problem, as he announced Sunday, is that all the fake jobs began to seem too much like real work. Maybe he was gamed by the game, but as reported on Kotaku, Sodapoppin has tendered his resignation (for real).

“GTA RP [role-play], in the position Kevin was in, was a true job,” he said during the livestream. “It was an actual job. It was brutal. It was ‘manager this, manager that,’ f–kin’ ‘employee this, cop problem that.’ I can think of five scenarios I actually got to do whatever I felt like, and that was going on the alien hunt and the couple of times I got to go to the police station. But the only reason I got to go to the police station was because I told my managers, ‘Hey, handle it. Handle the shop while I’m gone.’”

Being a fake wage-slave became such a drag that Sodapoppin hoped to have Kevin killed off in the game. But, as reported on Kotaku, that opportunity never availed itself. So Sodapoppin took virtual matters into his real hands.

“The fault is mainly on me,” said the social-media titan, who made enough money to buy into the esports league Northern Gaming (now owned by the much larger NRG Esports) and shot up his net worth with his own merch. “I simply put myself in a position of serious obligations. It’s too much. I like doing stupid things. I like dumb RP [role-playing]. I like playing with a lot of my friends outside of RP. But when I play Kevin, I’m not in a position to be able to do that because I have employees. I have f–king customers. I can’t just be like, ‘Hey, I feel like going on a bike ride.’ I can’t do that.”

Despite his popularity, Sodapoppin is not alone in realizing the emotional rigors of online gaming. As The Post reported Monday, Snoop Dogg also threw in the towel — but he did it after just 14 minutes of playing EA Sports’ Madden NFL ’21 live on Twitch. His session ended in a “rage quit” after the beloved stoner found himself losing 21-0 in no time. “Look at this s- -t. F- -k,” he is seen venting from the bottom-right corner of the frame (apparently not realizing he was still going out on Twitch). “I came in this room and everything went bad.”

Maybe Snoop Dogg is just figuring out something that Sodapoppin gleefully opined in a 2019 doc about him: “Twitch is a giant, glorified mental hospital.”

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Volvo plans to make only electric vehicles by 2030

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Volvo plans to make only electric vehicles by 2030

Volvo says it will make only electric vehicles by 2030. But if you want one, you’ll have to buy it online.

The Swedish automaker said Tuesday that it is phasing out the production of all cars with internal combustion engines — including hybrids.

“There is no long-term future for cars with an internal combustion engine,” said Henrik Green, Volvo’s chief technology officer.

Volvo’s announcement follows General Motors’ pledge earlier this year to make only battery-powered vehicles by 2035.

Volvo also said that, while its all-electric vehicles will be sold exclusively online, dealerships will “remain a crucial part of the customer experience and will continue to be responsible for a variety of important services such as selling, preparing, delivering and servicing cars.”

As part of the announcement Tuesday, the Swedish automaker will unveil its second fully electric car, a follow-up to last year’s XC40 Recharge, a compact SUV. Volvo said its goal is to have half of its global sales to be fully electric cars by 2025, with the remaining half made up of hybrids.

Automakers around the world are ramping up production of electric vehicles as charging technology improves and governments impose stricter pollution regulations.

“We are firmly committed to becoming an electric-only car maker,” Green said. “It will allow us to meet the expectations of our customers and be a part of the solution when it comes to fighting climate change.”

Despite the rising number of EVs available in the US, fully electric vehicles accounted for less than 2 percent of new vehicle sales last year. Americans continue to spend record amounts on gas-powered trucks and SUVs.

About 2.5 million electric vehicles were sold worldwide last year and industry analyst IHS Markit forecasts that to increase by 70 percent in 2021.

Volvo says it sold 661,713 cars in about 100 countries cars worldwide in 2020. According to Autodata Corp., 107,626 of those vehicles were sold in the US.

Founded in 1927, Volvo Cars has been owned by China’s Zhejiang Geely Holding Group since 2010.

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