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EA’s Laura Miele: Making games is hard, and it keeps changing

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EA has acquired Glu for $2.4 billion.

Join GamesBeat Summit 2021, happening today! Watch live here! 


Laura Miele said Electronic Arts is in charge of more than 8,000 game developers at more than 22 studio locations. But in the past year, the publisher’s chief of studios hasn’t seen much of those people.

In a fireside chat with Geoff Keighley at our GamesBeat Summit 2021 online event, Miele talked about what it was like to manage game teams during the pandemic. Miele gained about 500 more developers to manage today as EA closed the $2.4 billion acquisition of mobile game publisher Glu Mobile. EA also picked up more than 750 employees with the $1.2 billion of racing game maker Codemasters. All told, EA will have about 11,550 total employees after the Glu deal.

And Miele has to lead the bulk of those employees. She got her start in games at Westwood Studios, the maker of real-time strategy games such as Command & Conquer. She has participated in the evolution of triple-A games throughout a long career at EA. She was named chief studios officer in 2018. Before that, she served as executive vice president of global publishing, senior vice president of publishing, general manager of Star Wars games, senior vice president of global marketing, and vice president of strategic planning.

Working from home

Above: EA has acquired Glu for $2.4 billion.

Image Credit: EA/Glu

The development studios were put to the test in March 2020, when they had about 24 hours to shut down their offices and enable everyone to work at home.

“I think the resilience of the teams was astounding,” Miele said. “You do things a certain way. All of a sudden, you are completely out of the office, you’re completely disrupted. We were creative problem solving around things that we had never thought of before.”

Miele said that when she took over in 2018, she was very focused on improving the quality of development, creating better tools and technology and workflows. One of the big games getting a lot of love now is Respawn Entertainment’s Apex Legends, a free-to-play battle royale shooter that gets frequent updates.

“Everything has its unique challenges. I will say these teams are incredible,” she said. “We put out over 400 life service updates last year, and we launched 13 games.”

One of the challenges was putting out Star Wars: Squadrons last fall without being able to get access to a live orchestra. An audio engineer recorded one instrument at a time and then compiled the whole piece.

“With things like that, the teams were incredibly scrappy,” Miele said.

The mobile Battlefield

Battlefield will have a mobile version in 2022.

Above: Battlefield will have a mobile version in 2022.

Image Credit: EA

The teams also had big challenges testing games at a time when EA is increasing the number of games that it ships. And the company is creating more entry points. FIFA has a mobile game in addition to its PC and console mainstays. And each has live services. In the coming year, EA is planning to release a mobile game for Battlefield, using the Industrial Toys team in Pasadena, California, that EA acquired.

“We’re just super-excited to bring it to soft launch at the end of the summer,” Miele said. “I think it’s going to add to the Battlefield experience. It’s going to be really meaningful for Battlefield players. And it’s going to reach a lot more players around the globe for this brand. And that’s how we’re thinking about all of our big blockbuster brands and franchises.”

Later this year it will launch its new Battlefield console and PC game.

During the pandemic, EA decided to put Criterion’s latest Need for Speed on hold and move the team over to help DICE as it prepares to ship Battlefield. That was the kind of decision that Miele has to make regularly.

A world of user-generated content

The Sims 4 has diversity.

Above: The Sims 4 is one way folks can make their own content in EA games.

Image Credit: Associated Press

Keighley asked if EA is thinking hard about user-generated content as players show that they’re interested in experiences like Minecraft and Roblox. EA has its own The Sims and SimCity franchises that let people create their own experiences.

“To your goes in waves, right?” Miele said. “The industry certainly was at a place where it was curated linear experiences. And I think things are coming full circle and it is opening up. And we are incredibly passionate about putting capabilities and tools in the hands of people, so they can act on their own experiences. When I look at the long-range innovation projects, we have a group called SEED, the Search for Extraordinary Experiences Division of Electronic Arts.”

She added, “They incubate. They’re researching future innovations for technology and games. And one of the projects they’re working on is really cool. It’s this VR project where you can scan in a character and you can possess that character. And then, as you’re walking around in the room, the program captures your animation and applies that to the character. You can draw environments, you can place a second character in the environment, and interact with this character. And that is just about radical accessibility for tools and radical accessibility for people to create their experiences and have an impact on their game. I think that that is going to be incredibly important for the future.”

Miele said she also loves Battlefield because it is often like a sandbox, where players can play with weapons and vehicles and cause destruction in the environment.

“These only these crazy only-in-Battlefield moments happen,” she said. “This emergent play comes from players. As you can imagine, taking that strength and taking that superpower in this franchise and building on that in the future game is definitely part of our strategy. So new modes that are going to be added to the game experience are really in service of this ability that we want to give players to have an a bigger impact on their experience.”

As for The Sims, Miele said there is “a lot of fertile ground here for The Sims for sure.”

Players will get tools to play with, and EA is playing to make use of all of its learnings over 18 years for that franchise. She wants players to have flexibility, creativity, and tools to remix items and objects in the world. Skate could also be a franchise with a lot of user-generated content.

“You can imagine where we’re taking this franchise and this brand,” she said.

The metaverse

Laura Miele is chief studios officer at EA.

Above: Laura Miele is chief studios officer at EA.

Image Credit: EA

Regarding the metaverse, Miele said, “It is just so broadly used and broadly interpreted right. We really see it as a spatial and experiential evolution. It’s going to be a 3D experience of the actual internet, which is probably the true definition of what the metaverse is. And we are looking at it as bringing multiple experiences together. And there’s there’s a few buckets about how you can think about it. It could be as simple as a layer that connects multiple experiences. So it could be like a shopping mall. You go into one door and you have one experience, you go into another and you have another experience. The hub that connects those experiences could be a social place. It could be a place of gathering social gathering.”

She added, “The other way to think about it comes from a game experience. And so we were talking about Skate earlier. So Skate could be a game experience that starts in a certain feature set, and it can expand and be a place that people come together. They can build things in a world. They can share and interact with other players. So I think that metaverse experience that starts with the game experience and builds from there is like how Fortnite has concerts in it. And they certainly are looking to expand what that definition of that game is.”

And then she talked about one more way to think of the metaverse.

“We think of a Ready Player One as a 3D experiential place where you walk through a world,” she said. “I really love to think about our sports opportunity in that area, and that there are so many ways that you can consume sports media. And whether it be watching real sports games, checking data, connecting and talking with friends about about sports, playing sports and comparing that. So I think we have opportunities everywhere across the company, and with our franchises and our brands to really explore out and push out the definition of metaverse.”

She added, “There’s some foundational things about the metaverse. I think creativity and self expression and creating your own objects is certainly an important one. And then of course the aggregation of the masses. The aggregation of a lot of people together is another really important foundation of the concept of a metaverse.”

Keighley asked about social experiences in games. Miele said EA is also thinking about how to deliver its games, either as epic occasional drops of big games or perhaps episodic content that is more like a TV show.

“We launched them and how we serve them to players could change in a world like this,” Miele said. “I think it would be incredibly interesting. I think game companies are incredibly well-positioned, and well-poised, to lead in this area.”

Regarding how to invest in all these ideas, Miele said, “A lot of these ideas and experiences need to come from the game teams, because they are so close to their players. And I think that they really can see the big picture about how to bring these experiences together. And then we have technology requirements — that is a platform — and we as a company have been investing in that for a long time.”

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The DeanBeat: The FOMO over the decline of triple-A games is unwarranted

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Public offerings of game companies took off in Q1 2021.

Did you miss GamesBeat Summit 2021? Watch on-demand here! 


“I must not fear.
Fear is the mind-killer.
Fear is the little-death that brings total obliteration.
I will face my fear.
I will permit it to pass over me and through me.
And when it has gone past I will turn the inner eye to see its path.
Where the fear has gone there will be nothing. Only I will remain.”

— Frank Herbert, the litany against fear in Dune.

We had another panic this week about the decline of triple-A video games, and it showed that we have a lot of fear of missing out as fans. But I think some of this fear is based on a misunderstanding about the industry’s unique status as both a business and an art form. Hardcore gamers like the art form, while business people want to get rich from it. They don’t always trust each other’s motivations.

Ubisoft’s chief financial officer Frederick Duguet set off the panic among hardcore gamers when he said in an earnings call that putting out three or four triple-A games is not “a proper indication of [Ubisoft’s] value-creation dynamics.” Instead, Ubisoft expects to make generate more revenue from free-to-play live-service games. And so it had announced The Division: Heartland, a free-to-play shooter. Many fans took Duguet’s comments to mean that Ubisoft is going to make fewer triple-A games. So Ubisoft’s PR department had to intercede with a clarification the next day.

“Our intention is to deliver a diverse line-up of games that players will love – across all platforms. We are excited to be investing more in free-to-play experiences, however we want to clarify that this does not mean reducing our AAA offering,” a spokesperson said in a statement. “Our aim is to continue to deliver premium experiences to players such as Far Cry 6, Rainbow Six Quarantine, Riders Republic and Skull & Bones to name a few while also expanding our free-to-play portfolio and strengthening our brands to reach even more players.”

In other words, Ubisoft reassured fans that it’s not taking away your triple-A games. By extension, I will argue that all of the fads of the moment — nonfungible tokens (NFTs), blockchain, augmented reality, free-to-play mobile games, live services on FIFA Soccer, esports, user-generated content, remakes and retro games — are not taking away from your triple-A games. As Jeff Grubb pointed out, they’re additive. The game industry is expected to hit $175.8 billion in 2021, according to game and entertainment data firm Newzoo. As an industry, it is taking away time from sports, movies, music, TV, and other hobbies.

Above: Public offerings of game companies took off in Q1 2021.

Image Credit: InvestGame

The industry has enough money to go around. Everything in games is getting funded. Investors are pouring money into public offerings, acquisitions, and game startup investments. Even indie game makers are benefiting from this, and they continue to be the creative heartbeat of the industry, supplying the innovative games like Hades that triple-A game companies aren’t making. The first quarter saw $39 billion invested into the game industry in 280 announced transactions, according to InvestGame. That quarterly amount was higher than $33 billion reported for all of 2020.

Will mobile games get more budgeted money? Yes. Mobile games are 51% of the market and are growing. PC and consoles games could actually shrink in 2021, based on delays shipping big games during the pandemic. That’s going to happen, as it’s easier to invest in mobile games and increasingly harder to invest in PC and console games, which are often delayed.

“That’s kind of the dirty little secret of the video game business is that it is a business, after all, and we need to do, we need to create an audience, we need to create a revenue stream the cash flow in order to continue to create new and exciting games for people to play,” said Shawn Layden, former chairman of Sony Worldwide Game Studios, said at our recent GamesBeat Summit 2021 event.

You may not trust my answer here, but this is a good thing. The strategy that I see everybody pursuing right now makes perfect sense, and it will be good for all of games.

Why this is good news

First, mobile and free-to-play triple-A games are expanding the market. They are the tip of the spear when it comes to penetrating new markets and convincing people that games are a good use of their time. We’re at 3 billion gamers and growing, but not everybody on the planet is a gamer yet. By making the price of games more accessible, we enable games to reach more people. Those people will pick up the habit. They will find the new point of entry, and they will become gamers, hopefully for life. They will also keep playing these accessible and less time-consuming games even in periods of life when they’re busier, like when they have kids or have to study a lot or have to pour a lot of energy into work.

The key is that they are the point of entry into the vastness of games. Consider Call of Duty. Bobby Kotick, CEO of Activision Blizzard, had some foresight in getting three major game studios to make Call of Duty games in parallel, so that a new one could be launched every year without a sacrifice in the quality of the triple-A game. That wasn’t an easy process, and many accused Kotick of wrecking the franchise by making it too frequent. But the developers didn’t run into creative exhaustion. They converted players into wanting to play Call of Duty every year.

Now nine studios or so are working on Call of Duty. That allowed Activision Blizzard to add the free-to-play games Call of Duty: Mobile and Call of Duty: Warzone. These became the new points of entry for Call of Duty. Call of Duty also went cross-platform so you could play with friends wherever they were. You could start at the top of the funnel, playing for free. Within Warzone, all you had to do to upgrade to the $60 premium game was click a few buttons. Analyst Michael Pachter of Wedbush Securities estimates that Call of Duty premium game sales went up from around 25 million a year to 35 million a year. The result was record performance for Activision Blizzard in 2020. Now people play Call of Duty every year. And if you follow what Kotick said at our GamesBeat Summit 2021 event, increasing the share spent in the day by creating some kind of Call of Duty metaverse is probably the next goal.

Kotick said that the 10,000-person company now needs at least 2,000 more people to meet its production obligations. It’s making triple-A games like Diablo 4, but it is also making the free-to-play Diablo Immortal game for mobile. Do you see the pattern? Kotick is using the same strategy of Call of Duty with Diablo. Mobile and free-to-play games are the onramps to the franchise and you can expect to see Activision Blizzard execute on the same strategy for every major franchise.

No fear

Skull & Bones is looking awesome.

Above: Skull & Bones is coming one of these days from Ubisoft.

Image Credit: Ubisoft

The financial success of Call of Duty and Activision Blizzard isn’t lost on Electronic Arts, which is making a mobile game based on Battlefield. That will be the onramp for Battlefield VI, the triple-A game that is in production. EA has a mobile Apex Legends game that will be the onramp for the free-to-play Apex Legends, and maybe Respawn will fill out the roster with a triple-A Apex Legends (or maybe Titanfall) premium game.

With Ubisoft, the free-to-play The Division: The Heartland can be an onramp to The Division or The Division 2 games. And so on. These efforts are not going to cannibalize each other, in my opinion. They are going to make it more likely that players will become hobbyists. The hobby will not just be games. It will be more specific than that. The hobby will become Call of Duty, or Diablo, or Apex Legends, or The Division. These franchises will command all of our time, and people will constantly cycle through them from the top of the funnel to the bottom.

On our GamesBeat Summit panel, Layden was more focused on Sony’s own specific challenges. But he was right in that platform owners — and by extension the whole game industry — has the responsibility of expanding the market. The lower the price point, the lower risk it is for the industry. Hollywood, by contrast, has been slow to lower the ticket prices of movies. In fact, it raised them just in time for the pandemic. It’s no surprise that streaming movie services took off during the pandemic because they were cheaper. The price spectrum of games captures all the right players.

Hardcore gamers should also be aware that what they want to play isn’t what everyone wants to play. As the game industry expands out of its ghetto of 200 million or 300 million gamers, it will have to serve more diverse content than it ever has, to capture people like older players, international players in emerging markets and different cultures, and women. As it expands to mobile and free-to-play games, the industry should remember that it shouldn’t make just the same old franchises for the new players.

And as everybody becomes a gamer, the game market becomes bigger, the opportunity for each game is higher, and we will get better games of all kinds as a result — including better triple-A games.

The goose and the eggs

Dean Takahashi moderates a new IP panel with Shawn Layden, Ante Odic, and Marty O'Donnell.

Above: Dean Takahashi moderates a new IP panel with Shawn Layden, Ante Odic, and Marty O’Donnell.

Image Credit: GamesBeat

Layden, who had to oversee 13 first-party game studios for the PlayStation business, said that churning out sequels and providing fan service on important franchises is a necessary part of the business. But eventually, everyone comes around to realize the importance of doing original games.

“If we continue to make the same type of game over and over again, we will continue to appeal to the same audience we already have over and over again. We won’t be able to break out gaming into into a wider and larger business. We talk a lot about how video game business is the largest entertainment business in the world. But we really don’t punch above our weight when it comes to society and culture. And I think that’s because we don’t bring a diverse enough audience into enjoying gaming. And that’s why original intellectual property is important.”

Layden knows that going to a board of directors and pitching them a game that will cost $280 million to make over five years isn’t easy. That is a difficult pitch for anybody to make, no matter who you are. But those kinds of bets have to be made.

“It’s definitely problematic that the budgets have skyrocketed,” said one executive who participated in a secret roundtable at GamesBeat Summit 2021. “On the other end of the spectrum, that’s defensibility if you’ve got 10 million people playing every month. There are precious few that can assemble the budgets have the IP, have the distribution network, and the global brands to be able to compete in a market where people’s time is scarce.”

Grand Theft Auto Online: Arena Wars.

Above: Grand Theft Auto Online: Arena Wars.

Image Credit: Rockstar Games

A game like Grand Theft Auto V can sell 150 million units — a number that wasn’t possible more than a decade ago. So the upside is tremendous, and these franchises once established can give birth to live services, media spinoffs in adjacent entertainment markets, and high-margin mobile opportunities. The upside to that initial $280 million investment is tens of billions in additional market capitalization for the company that achieves it.

“If you perform at the highest level, and you have structural competitive advantages, it might actually be a virtue for the platform players at the top of the ecosystem to spend that much and deliver something that is polished and really, truly, triple-A,” he said. “You get a disproportionate share of a much, much bigger pie.”

Also on that panel was Ante Odic, senior vice president of product at Outfit7, the maker of the Talking Tom series and other games that have been downloaded 15 billion times. Even Outfit7 is investing to find the next Talking Tom as it knows that new IP is so critical. And just because it is investing in Talking Tom doesn’t mean that it isn’t investing in new IP. It’s not a zero-sum game.

“We have a wide audience,” Odic said. “But we want to go even wider.”

Marty O’Donnell, cofounder of Highwire Games and a former leader at Bungie, noted how the creative team wanted to move on from the successful Halo franchise to something new, so much so that they eventually spun Bungie out of Microsoft to be able to reach that aim.

“We wanted to do something new,” O’Donnell said. He reminded us of the fairy tale about the goose that laid the golden eggs. The important thing wasn’t the golden eggs. It was the goose. You don’t want to kill the goose laying the golden eggs, O’Donnell said.

“My slogan is be nice to the goose. And the goose is the team that lays the golden egg,” he said. “And being nice to the golden egg means you’re just going to make sequels that that are dead. But if you’re nice to the team that makes the lays the golden egg, that’s the only way to get really good new golden eggs. Certainly you don’t want to stab the goose and try to cut it open. But all I would ask for for publishers and developers is be nice to the goose because that’s how you’re going to get more eggs.”

A beautiful industry structure

DreamHaven is the new game company started by Mike and Amy Morhaime.

Above: DreamHaven is the new game company started by Mike and Amy Morhaime.

Image Credit: DreamHaven

And remember, if one company retreats from triple-A games, another may attack that opportunity. If Sony were to bail out of triple-A original games and shirk its responsibility, only to focus on sequels and free-to-play low-hanging fruit, it would lose its triple-A creators. They would go to another company like Nintendo or Microsoft or Epic Games or Valve or Ubisoft or Electronic Arts ….You get the point.

They could also seek creative freedom in indie games or start a new triple-A studio. That sort of thing is happening, as Harold Ryan has multiple triple-A games going at Probably Monsters. If Riot Games gets a little sleepy at innovation, the former Riot veterans at Theorycraft Games, which raised $37 million, or the scrappy ex-Riot team at Hidden Leaf Games will be happy to pick up the mantle and hire the Riot leaders who prefer to work on groundbreaking titles.

As I mentioned, a record amount of money is available to the game industry’s creators at all levels, from the newly minted public company Roblox that is worth $39.6 billion to Animoca Brands that has raised $88 billion at a $1 billion valuation to make NFT games to DreamHaven Games, founded by former Blizzard president Mike Morhaime and Amy Morhaime. The game industry has enough money pouring in at once to fund everything that it needs and to make every game that we want. It has never been like this before.

For gamers, don’t worry, be happy. And for game developers, heed what Layden said. “Find the best risks and take them. If you stay the course and keep true to the vision, you will be more delighted with the outcome.”

GamesBeat

GamesBeat’s creed when covering the game industry is “where passion meets business.” What does this mean? We want to tell you how the news matters to you — not just as a decision-maker at a game studio, but also as a fan of games. Whether you read our articles, listen to our podcasts, or watch our videos, GamesBeat will help you learn about the industry and enjoy engaging with it.

How will you do that? Membership includes access to:

  • Newsletters, such as DeanBeat
  • The wonderful, educational, and fun speakers at our events
  • Networking opportunities
  • Special members-only interviews, chats, and “open office” events with GamesBeat staff
  • Chatting with community members, GamesBeat staff, and other guests in our Discord
  • And maybe even a fun prize or two
  • Introductions to like-minded parties

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Continue Reading

Tech

Facebook’s new technique helps AI systems forget irrelevant information

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Facebook Expire-Span

Join Transform 2021 this July 12-16. Register for the AI event of the year.


Facebook says it has developed an AI technique that enables machine learning models to only retain certain information while forgetting the rest. The company claims that the operation, Expire-Span, can predict information most relevant to a task at hand, allowing AI systems to process information at larger scales.

AI models memorize information without distinction — unlike human memory. Mimicking the ability to forget (or not) at the software level is challenging, but a worthwhile endeavor in machine learning. Intuitively, if a system can remember 5 things, those things should ideally be really important. But state-of-the-art model architectures focus on parts of data selectively, leading them to struggle with large quantities of information like books or videos and incurring high computing costs.

This can contribute to other problems like catastrophic learning or catastrophic interference, a phenomenon where AI systems fail to recall what they’ve learned from a training dataset. The result is that the systems have to be constantly reminded of the knowledge they’ve gained or risk becoming “stuck” with their most recent “memories.”

Several proposed solutions to the problem focus on compression. Historical information is compressed into smaller chunks, letting the model extend further into the past. The drawback, however, is “blurry” versions of memory that can affect the accuracy of the model’s predictions.

Facebook’s alternative is Expire-Span, which gradually forgets irrelevant information. Expire_span works by first predicting which information is most important for a task at hand, based on context. It then assigns each piece of information with an expiration date such that when the date passes, the information is deleted from the system.

Facebook says that Expire-Span achieves leading results on a benchmark for character-level language modeling and improves efficiency across long-context workloads in language modeling, reinforcement learning, object collision, and algorithmic tasks.

The importance of forgetting

It’s believed that without forgetting, humans would have basically no memory at all. If we remembered everything, we’d likely be inefficient because our brains would be swamped with superfluous memories.

Research suggests that one form of forgetting, intrinsic forgetting, involves a certain subset of cells in the brain that degrade physical traces of traces of memories called engrams. The cells reverse the structural changes that created the memory engram, which is preserved through a consolidation process.

New memories are formed through neurogenesis, which can complicate the challenge of retrieving prior memories. It’s theorized that neurogenesis damages the older engrams or makes it harder to isolate the old memories from newer ones.

Expire-Span attempts to induce intrinsic forgetting in AI and capture the neurogenesis process in software form.

Expire-Span

Normally, AI systems tasked with, for example, finding a yellow door in a hallway may memorize information like the color of other doors, the length of the hallway, and the texture of the floor. With Expire-Gan, the model can forget unnecessary information processed on the way to the door and remember only bits essential to the task, like the color of the sought-after door.

To calculate the expiration dates of words, images, video frames, and other information, Expire-Span determines how long the information is preserved as a memory each time a new piece of data is presented. This gradual decay is key to retaining important information without blurring it, Facebook says. Expire-Span essentially makes predictions based on context learned from data and influenced by its surrounding memories.

For example, if an AI system is training to perform a word prediction task, it’s possible with Expire-Span to teach the system to remember rare words like names but forget filler words like “the,” “and,” and “of.” By looking at previous, relevant content, Expire-Span predicts if something can be forgotten or not.

Facebook Expire-Span

Facebook says that Expire-Span can scale to tens of thousands of pieces of information and has the ability to retain less than a thousand bits of it. As a next step, the plan is to investigate how the underlying techniques might be used to incorporate different types of memories into AI systems.

“While this is currently research, we could see the Expire-Span method used in future real-world applications that might benefit from AI that forgets nonessential information,” Facebook wrote in a blog post. “Theoretically, one day, Expire-Span could empower people to more easily retain information they find most important for these types of long-range tasks and memories.”

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GitHub now lets all developers upload videos to demo bugs and features

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GitHub now lets all developers upload videos to demo bugs and features

Join Transform 2021 this July 12-16. Register for the AI event of the year.


GitHub has officially opened up video uploads five months after launching in beta, allowing all developers to include .mp4 or .mov files directly in pull requests, discussions, issues, comments, and more.

The feature is designed to help developers visually demonstrate to project maintainers the steps they went through when they encountered a bug, for example, or illustrate what a major new code change achieves in terms of functionality.

So rather than having to follow detailed step-by-step textual instructions which may be ambiguous or unclear, it’s now easier to see exactly what’s happening at the other end first-hand and should go some way toward avoiding time-consuming back-and-forth written discussions. This could also be used in conjunction with a voice track with a narrator explaining the on-screen actions.

Above: Video in GitHub

It’s worth noting that with this launch, GitHub also now fully supports video uploads from within its mobile app.

ezgif.com gif maker 2

Above: Uploading video to GitHub via mobile app

Seeing is believing

Native video upload support helps bypass the cumbersome alternative involving recording and uploading a video to a third-party platform, then sharing a link. On that note, GitHub actually doesn’t yet support video unfurling from shared links, but that is something it said that it’s working on, alongside enabling video annotations for specific pieces of code.

At a time when the world has had to adapt to remote work and collaboration, learning to embrace asynchronous communication is one of the fundamental factors for distributed teams to succeed — recorded video plays a big part in enabling this.

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