Connect with us

Breaking News

Cuomo backers pause fundraising amid sexual harassment claims

Published

on

Cuomo backers pause fundraising amid sexual harassment claims

New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo could lose crucial financial backing as he faces an independent investigation into sexual harassment allegations from two former aides.

Fundraisers and donors told CNBC they are pausing and reevaluating their support of Cuomo, who has said he will be seeking a fourth term when he’s up for reelection next year.

“No one is giving to him now. Everything is on hold,” one finance executive told the outlet.

The powerful Democrat’s campaign has raised more than $4 million since July, and started 2021 with a war chest of $16 million.

But several Wall Street executives close to Cuomo donors and bundlers told the network that efforts to raise funds have either halted or are being rethought amid the allegations.

“They’re in a wait-and-see mode, meaning not writing a check now but also not willing to completely cut him off yet,” one person told the outlet.

“f this blows over, they don’t want to have gotten on the wrong side of the governor,” the source added.

New York businessman Bernard Schwartz, who has given $70,000 to Cuomo’s campaign since 2019, said the governor may not deserve another term.

“Unless he comes forward and faces it completely and openly and honestly, he doesn’t deserve a fourth term, even though I like him immensely,” Schwartz told CNBC.

“I think people who like him and have been with him for a long time are scratching their heads asking, how did he put himself in that position,” he added.

But billionaire business mogul John Catsimatidis, who gave $10,000 to Cuomo’s campaign in 2018, told The Post he isn’t bailing on the gov just yet.

“Cuomo has explaining to do but we should give him a chance to prove his innocence,” Catsimatidis said.

“The people I talk to [say] there is a higher chance of Cuomo surviving this than not.”

Still, the Cuomo campaign likely won’t be asking for donations until the dust settles, said Kathry Wylde, CEO of the Partnership for New York City, which reps many of the Big Apple’s donor-rich financial services firms and business moguls.

“I doubt contributors have had an opportunity to digest the situation,” Wylde told The Post.

“But it would be surprising if the governor is soliciting campaign donations until the investigation of the sexual harassment accusations is completed.”

Meanwhile, corporations who backed Cuomo in 2018 — including AT&T, Comcast, Citigroup, JP Morgan and Bank of America — likely won’t push back on him right away, insiders said.

“Many of these corporations are located in New York and have interests in New York and they will likely stand with the governor because it’s in their interests to do so,” Democratic political strategist Hank Sheinkopf told CNBC.

  

Continue Reading
Advertisement
Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Breaking News

Penn State to replace ‘sexist and classist’ words like freshman

Published

on

Penn State to replace 'sexist and classist' words like freshman

Pigskin powerhouse Penn State has jumped on the woke wagon.

The sprawling public university will replace pronouns such as he/him/hers with they/them/theirs; replace traditional student designations such as freshman and sophomore with “first year” and “second year” and; replace “underclassmen” and “upperclassmen” with “lower division” and “upper division,” according to Penn State News.

The Preferred Name and Gender Identity Policy was passed by Pennsylvania State University’s Senate Committee on Curricular Affairs on April 27.

“Terms such as ‘freshmen’ are decidedly male-specific, while terms such as ‘upperclassmen’ can be interpreted as both sexist and classist. Terms such as ‘junior’ and ‘senior’ are parallel to western male father-son naming conventions, and much of our written documentation uses he/she pronouns,” states the resolution. 

“It is time to close the loop and ensure that all people are not only able to choose their name & gender identity within our systems, but that these documents and systems are also structured to be inclusive from the start.”

The decision was mocked by some people on social media.

“I am at my wit’s end with all of this stupidity,” said one Penn State parent on Twitter.

Asked Bill Bressier on Twitter, referencing the school’s sports teams’ nickname: “How long is that until the ‘Nittany Lion,’ which is a male term, is replaced by the gender neutral, correct subspecies ‘Eastern Cougar?’”

Penn State will also no longer use the phrase “super senior” to denote those students whose studies last beyond the traditional four years. They will instead be called fifth-year (or beyond) students.

The term super seniors “does often carry a slightly negative connotation,” the resolution noted.

Penn State announced in 2018 that it was dropping the titles homecoming “king” and “queen.”

Continue Reading

Breaking News

New book reveals how to win friends and influence post-COVID

Published

on

New book reveals how to win friends and influence post-COVID

Prior to the pandemic, Jon Levy was best known as the founder of the Influencers Dinner, a regular roving dinner party of A-listers — strangers to each other — pulled from different industries. The location would be revealed shortly before the event, and there were a few ground rules: Everyone would cook dinner together, and no one could reveal their last name or where they worked. 

It was all very mysterious. 

“There would always be this moment where people arrive for the cocktail hour,” says Levy, a behavioral scientist and author of the new book, “You’re Invited: The Art and Science of Cultivating Influence.” “And they invariably say, ‘Do you mind if I call my wife? I just want to tell her I still have my kidneys.’ ” Past guests have included Nobel laureates, Olympic athletes, executives, scientists, and the Grammy-winning voice of the bark from “Who Let the Dogs Out.” 

This past year, when the COVID-19 pandemic forced everyone to their Zoom squares to socialize digitally, Levy realized that virtual events can be rewarding — they just have to be planned differently. 

“When TV came out, the answer to programming wasn’t to have people reading soap operas. The new platform created a new way to engage, and that’s the same with digital,” he explains. “When we design our events, we design the experiences to focus on you, the individual, so you feel you’re connecting with people. We start off by putting people in breakout rooms to meet each other. The key is not to leave people to interview each other. Humans do best when there’s a shared effort or activity. If I give you a puzzle to figure out or an icebreaker game, that’s really important. These games cause a shared investment of effort. Now you’re a team.” 

Levy’s work as a behavioral scientist focuses on influence and human connection, never more important than in the current times. 

“I really value bringing people together. And when you look at the research, people are getting lonelier and more isolated,” says Levy. “I’m all for people earning more money and having nice things, but it just doesn’t carry the day. And [by writing this], I was hoping that if I worked hard enough, we can begin to shift the cultural conversation about what gives people a higher quality of life.” 

Check out jonlevytlb.com/games for several different examples of activities to be played at virtual events. 

Continue Reading

Breaking News

Body of missing KPMG executive Alan White found in Texas

Published

on

Body of missing KPMG executive Alan White found in Texas

The body of a Dallas businessman who has been missing since October was found in a wooded area of the Texas city.

A survey crew working for Paul Quinn College found human remains near the campus Thursday, police said.

The Dallas County Medical Examiner identified the remains as Alan White, an executive at accounting firm KPMG who was last seen gassing up his Porsche after a gym visit on Oct. 22.

The 55-year-old’s vehicle was found about a week later, and there were no signs of a struggle or accident.

“Your mind goes through all these scenarios of what could’ve happened,” White’s husband Rusty Jenkins said at the time. “But it’s all just kind of guesses until we get some facts or some leads. But your mind plays games all day of what did happen, what could’ve happened.”

There is a $10,000 reward for information related to the case.

Continue Reading

Trending