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Cuomo allegedly talked to accuser about ‘never giving up power’

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Cuomo allegedly talked to accuser about 'never giving up power'

Gov. Andrew Cuomo — who has resisted calls to step down amid a sexual harassment scandal — once told one of his accusers, Charlotte Bennett, that “people in positions of power will never give up that power,” she recalled in a new interview.

The embattled governor made the remarks during a two-hour conversation with Bennett, a former aide, in January 2020, according to a newly released extended version of the interview Bennett did with the CBS Evening News.

Bennett, 25, said the two were discussing the state’s “Enough is Enough” law to fight sexual assaults on college campuses. Bennett said she worked as an activist while at Hamilton College to support assault survivors.

“He explained to me that it was something that was very near and dear to his heart. He was even teary at that point explaining how important it is that women feel safe,” Bennett told CBS Anchor Norah O’Donnell. “I remember his saying ‘I don’t know if you should engage in this work professionally.’ He said people in positions of power will never give up that power and I will always be on the wrong side.”

Bennett said the next extended conversation she had with Cuomo took place in his office in May 2020 when he uncomfortably spoke to her about her experience as a sexual assault survivor — and his own TV ratings.

“He asked why people weren’t watching his press conference and that he was losing viewers,” Bennett recalled. “I really think that he had this 15 minutes of international, national attention and that was starting to wane. He was lonely. He was anxious. He was angry. And really isolated.”

It was after a June 5, 2020, meeting in the governor’s office that Bennett has said she felt Cuomo, 63, was trying to proposition her for sex.

Cuomo said on Wednesday that “I now understand that I acted in a way that made people feel uncomfortable” and vowed not to resign.

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U of California to nix SAT, ACT in settlement with minority students

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U of California to nix SAT, ACT in settlement with minority students

The University of California agreed to no longer consider SAT or ACT scores when making admissions and scholarship decisions under a settlement finalized Friday in a 2019 lawsuit filed on behalf of low income students of color and students with disabilities. 

The 10-campus system, which has more than 280,000 students statewide, decided not to continue fighting a judge’s injunction issued last fall that barred it from considering the scores for admission even when submitted voluntarily, the San Francisco Chronicle reported. Students may still elect to submit SAT or ACT scores to satisfy the entry level writing requirement or for placement in courses. 

The lawsuit argued that low income students of color were at disadvantage because standardized test questions often contain inherent bias that more privileged children are better equipped to answer and wealthier students often take expensive prep course to boost scores that others cannot afford. It also argues the students with disabilities could not easier travel to exams and class sites.  

The settlement, reached earlier this month, “ensures that the university will not revert to its planned use of the SAT and ACT — which its own regents have admitted are racist metrics,” Amanda Savage, an attorney representing the students, said in a statement obtained by the Chronicle. 

The UC Board of Regents voted last year to drop the SAT and ACT tests as admission requirements through 2024 and eliminate them for California residents after that. Incoming students this fall didn’t submit SAT or ACT scores. However, regents had said applicants for fall 2021 and 2022 could submit the scores voluntarily. The new settlement will “provide certainty for students and their families, counselors, and high schools,” the school said.

College Board, which produced the SAT, rejected the notion that their standardized tests were inherently racist – though it did recognize inequities in the education system. 

“Real inequities exist in American education, and they are reflected in every measure of academic achievement, including the SAT,” College Board’s executive director for communications, Zach Goldberg, said in a statement obtained by the New York Times. “The SAT itself is not a racist instrument. Every question is rigorously reviewed for evidence of bias and any question that could favor one group over another is discarded.”

Under the agreement, SAT and ACT scores won’t be considered for admission for students applying for entry between fall 2021 and spring 2025. However, the scores that are submitted voluntarily can be used for course placement after a student is admitted.

FairTest, a Massachusetts-based nonprofit group that is generally opposed to standardized testing, announced last month that more than 1,400 accredited colleges and universities that grant bachelor’s degrees won’t require students applying for fall 2022 admission to submit test scores. That is more than 60% of the undergraduate institutions in the United States, the group said.

The University of California announced on Jan. 28 that the system received the highest number of undergraduate applications in its history for the fall 2021 admission, which included surges among African American and Chicano/Latino students. California Community College transfer applications also grew by an impressive margin, the university system said. 

Campuses saw significant growth of freshman applications from African American students, with an increase of 1,505 applications or 21.8 percent, as well as Chicano/Latino students, with a jump of 5,250 or 12.2 percent, the university system said. 

“The makeup of this year’s applicants already show that students are no longer deterred from applying based on their inability to access standardized testing,” Marci Lerner Miller, another attorney representing the students, said in a statement about the settlement. “We’re confident that this settlement will lead to students demonstrating their abilities, rather than their disabilities, in the application process.” 

The Associated Press contributed to this report. 

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Pregnant OnlyFans star Carla Bellucci plans to livestream birth for money

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Pregnant OnlyFans star Carla Bellucci plans to livestream birth for money

Carla Bellucci, a pregnant British OnlyFans star has been leveraging her growing child for cold hard cash, the Daily Star reports.

Interest in her pregnancy has become so intense, Carla Bellucci, who hails from Hitchin, Herts, which lies north of London, has received a $14,000 offer to livestream her birth on OnlyFans.

Pregnant with her fourth child, Carla Bellucci, 39, rocketed to fame and then to OnlyFans stardom after sneakily getting the UK’s National Health Service to cover her nose job.

“I have been offered £10,000 from one of my OnlyFans to live-stream my birth – and you know what, why not?” she announced.

“I am going to give fans the chance to live-stream my birth for £10,000.

Pregnant mum to live-stream birth on OnlyFans for £10k and has offers to sell breastmilk

“I mean, people give birth on that programme One Born Every Minute and I can’t see the difference,” Carla Bellucci, the pregnant OnlyFans star, reasoned.

“I’m sure they don’t even get paid!”

As her pregnancy advances, Carla Bellucci says she is ready to deal with any haters who try and drag her for giving birth on OnlyFans livestream.

Indy100 reports that as soon as she got pregnant, Carla Belllucci saw her OnlyFans fanbase swell right along with her belly.

The OnlyFans subscription service allows users to make money from shared content that usually stars themselves and is often adult in nature.

Pregnant OnlyFans star is planning to live-stream birth to subscribers for £10,000

“I know people are going to go crazy but I’m a businesswoman and I need to make money,” Carla Bellucci told the Daily Star of her plans to livestream the culmination of her pregnancy on OnlyFans.

“I am my business,” the influencer noted, according to the Daily Record.

“I am nervous about live-streaming my birth but at the end of the day it’s a lot of money to refuse.”

Since first announcing her pregnancy, Carla Bellucci had one of her “best months” on OnlyFans, she said.

Carla says that since she started adding pregnancy pictures to her account her OnlyFans income has gone up substantially.

Pregnant OnlyFans mum plans to live-stream baby’s birth to make £10k

Carla Bellucci says that since announcing her pregnancy on OnlyFans, she’s had requests for her breastmilk.

She draws the line there, finding the requests untoward and shocking.

Rationalizing her efforts to hawk her pregnant body on OnlyFans, Carla Bellucci said,  “People go on the beach in bikinis while they’re pregnant – what’s the difference? I’m not nude!”

The Mirror reports that she plans to keep photos of her baby off of social media — unless someone pays her enough.

“I’d want a good magazine deal, I’d want around £15,000,” she admits. “I know it’s not loads of money, but I am not Katie Price so can’t ask for half a million just yet.”

Pregnant mum plans to live-stream herself giving birth on OnlyFans for £10,000

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Oakland homeless advocates turn encampment into ‘a little oasis’

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Oakland homeless advocates turn encampment into 'a little oasis'

A group of Oakland residents developed a creative way to attack the city’s burgeoning housing crisis. They built their own “community center” at a homeless encampment beneath a highway overpass.

Called Cob on the Wood, the working village includes the basics of home, such as toilet, shower and kitchen, plus a health clinic and small store, The San Jose Mercury News reported.

“It’s sort of like a little oasis in the middle of nowhere that makes you feel like maybe you’re normal again,” John Janosko, who lives in a trailer in the encampment, told the paper, which described the development “like something out of a fairy tale.”

One publication describes an idyllic setting:

“Winding stone pathways connect the structures and are bordered by little gardens of herbs, greens, and flowers. The kitchen has a stove, sink with running water, shelving full of bread and a refrigerator full of food. Herbs and emergency medical supplies fill the clinic. The shower’s water runs hot.”

Amenities reportedly include pizza oven, fire pit and open mic nights.

The village challenges local regulations, zoning laws, health ordinances and safety issues.

The Oakland city auditor in April released a report that highlighted a litany of problems that plague the city’s estimated 140 homeless communities, including: 1,599 interventions for “hygiene and garbage services” from 2018 to 2020, 1,458 police calls and 988 fires over the same period.

Cob on the Wood advocates hope the village mitigates many of those problems.

“This place and what we created can serve as a model for other encampments across Oakland, across the nation and across the world,” Xochitl Bernadette Moreno, co-founder and director of the grassroots group Essential Food and Medicine, told the Mercury News.

Her group helped build Cob on the Wood with two other activist organizations, Living Earth Structures and Artists Building Communities.

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