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Canada’s vaccine disaster and other commentary

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Canada's vaccine disaster and other commentary

From the right: Canada’s Vaccine Disaster

The “government health-care systems in Canada and Europe have repeatedly failed” during the pandemic, notes Katie Pavlich at The Hill, unlike America’s private system. With “Operation Warp Speed, the federal government partnered with the private sector, rather than controlling it, to produce” vaccines “in record time.” President Donald Trump predicted in September 2020 we’d have enough doses for every American adult by April 2021, and in fact, “vaccine supply will soon be an oversupply.” In Canada, by contrast, “there is a shortage,” with a panel recommending provinces wait four months to give people their second shot instead of the two or three weeks here. Universal government-provided health insurance “isn’t health care. Americans should remember this next time Democrats advocate” abolishing the private system.

Libertarian: Progs Want To Control Everything

On Wednesday, President Biden outlined “the most expensive and expansive agenda in modern American history,” marvels Eric Boehm at Reason — including $6 trillion in new spending, “a $15 national minimum wage,” “protectionism for unions” and “new entitlement programs.” He also “promised to raise taxes on the wealthy and to sic the IRS on rich people.” Yet all that isn’t good enough for Rep. Jamaal Bowman (D–NY) and fellow progressives. “We need to think bigger,” huffed Bowman after the speech, illustrating progressives’ longing for “control over just about every aspect of life.” They’re “unlikely to be satisfied with Biden’s agenda no matter how” profligate; “that’s in their nature.” Yet “what’s more worrying is how far they’ve already managed to push” him.

Media watch: Fact-Checkers Give Joe a Pass

Now that Joe Biden’s president, the media are scaling back their fact-checking, observes Spiked’s Fraser Myers. They think now that “the ‘adults’ are back in charge” and “Donald Trump is out of the picture,” journalists can put their trust in “old, reliable Uncle Joe.” So The Washington Post will “no longer maintain its fact-checking database of Joe Biden’s claims.” And Markos Moulitsas, founder of the liberal blog Daily Kos, declares, “So weird, not having to fact-check a presidential speech.” What a shift: In the age of Trump, fact-checking was elevated from “a routine part of journalism” to “a performance of opposition.” Meanwhile, Biden “has a serious case of foot-in-mouth disease,” yet the “urgency to set the record straight” is gone. “Fact-checking has served its purpose.”

Pandemic journal: Apologize to Dr. Atlas

Virus guru Dr. Anthony Fauci and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention just relaxed outdoor-masking rules — yet, recalls The Federalist’s Jordan Davidson, it was Team Trump’s Dr. Scott Atlas who first “pushed back on masking outdoors and questioned the dominant narrative that conquering the virus required a fear-filled approach.” Asked Atlas: “Why in the world would you wear a mask if you’re riding your bicycle all alone outside? Why in the world would you wear a mask if you’re in your own car driving?” Yet, Davidson notes, “the mouthpieces at the CDC . . . were clearly opposed to Atlas’ thinking,” Fauci characterized him as an “outlier,” and the “corporate media” piled on against him. Now his sane views are “making a comeback.”

Foreign desk: China’s Stoking US Division

“China’s Communist leadership is no position to lecture anybody about racism” — yet it does, growls Ian Williams at Spectator USA. “Two years ago, China had almost no diplomatic presence on Western social media. Now around 200 diplomats” use these platforms “to sow disinformation and discord,” with Twitter closing “170,000 accounts linked to the Chinese government” last June alone. “Chinese diplomats reveled in American protests over policing and race,” accusing the US of “double standards on human rights” to “deflect attention” from its Uighur genocide. After the Atlanta spa shootings, “Chinese state media used Facebook, Twitter and YouTube to stoke a narrative of American racism and hatred.” It’s a devilish scheme: “In targeting identity politics, China is stoking the most difficult and divisive issues in America.”

— Compiled by The Post Editorial Board

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Opinion

Still hopeless on NYC’s homeless

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Still hopeless on NYC’s homeless

New York City Transit President Sarah Feinberg minced no words Sunday in slamming the homeless advocates who “have sort of decided that the subway is a reasonable place for folks to live.”

“The answer should never be that someone lives on a bench or someone lives in a tunnel,” she told WABC radio. Darn right. And: “It boggles the mind that there are groups out there that have decided that this is an acceptable solution for these folks.” 

Worse, these groups “have devoted their time and their resources and their advocacy skills” to enabling such abuse of public spaces.

Yet Mayor Bill de Blasio, for his homelessness czar, tapped one of these advocates: Steven Banks, who has presided over a vast increase in city spending on the homeless and a simultaneous rise in the street-homeless problem.

Indeed, the advocates have city politicians so afraid to adopt a “tough love” approach to the homeless that Gov. Andrew Cuomo had to order late-night subway closures in the name of “cleaning,” just to stop these tortured souls from utterly taking over the system. But the closures are about to end — what then?

One good idea is to have places to bring the homeless besides a hospital or jail. But de Blasio put that initiative under the ThriveNYC umbrella — so it’s failed.

As The City reports, City Hall spent over $100 million to build two “diversion centers” for the mentally ill. But one hasn’t opened, and the other is barely used.

That’s right: Four years after $52 million went to rehab a 14,000-square-foot former IRS office in a graffiti-covered Bronx building into one center, it sits empty. Another $51 million actually opened the operation in East Harlem … this past November. It’s served a scant 45 clients since.

In short, conventional progressive thinking fails miserably at soft as well as tough love. Pray that the next mayor breaks from this foolishness.

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Opinion

The wrong time to enforce the new plastic-bag law

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The wrong time to enforce the new plastic-bag law

Sometimes, officials are too eager to move after a media exposé. Case in point, the reaction of the state Department of Environmental Conservation to reporting by The City that no grocery or bodega had been fined for ignoring the new ban on single-use plastic shopping bags.

Boom: Within hours, DEC announced it had issued 12 violation notices, to nine small businesses and three larger entities, including grocery chain Gristedes.

Hello: There’s a pandemic on, adding to the dangers of (already unsanitary) reusable bags and leaving residents, especially in lower-income areas, even more dependent on the closest-available food store.

The DEC, in short, had every reason to just issue written warnings (64 as of April 14) and hold off on fines. But now it has vowed to get tough, including $250 to $500 fines for ignoring warnings.

If Gov. Andrew Cuomo wants some good press, he should loudly order the DEC to return to its policy of mercy. Tell the environmental activists to hold their whining until the pandemic is over.

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Opinion

Eric Adams is the right choice for NYC

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Eric Adams is the right choice for NYC

The Post’s endorsement of Brooklyn Borough President Eric Adams for mayor on Monday has sparked considerable attention, with key figures joining in backing him. Below is a roundup of what they’re saying.

Bronx Borough President Ruben Diaz Jr.: “Eric Adams will be a great mayor for the city of New York. I’m glad The Post agrees about having someone with Eric’s career and life experience informing him about how to fight for all New Yorkers.”

Diaz has been an increasingly important force in Democratic circles in the city whose endorsement will carry much weight.

Brooklyn Councilman Justin Brannan: “New York City is the nation’s economic engine and the fuel for that engine lives in the so-called ‘outer boroughs.’ Indeed, nearly 75 percent of all New York City essential workers live in Brooklyn, Queens, The Bronx and Staten Island. Eric Adams knows this, and that’s why he will be a mayor keyed in to the communities, like the one I represent, that are at the edge of the city geographically but at the core of what makes our city run.”

Brannan represents moderate and diverse working-class communities in Brooklyn that could help propel Adams to victory.

Henry Garrido, executive director, DC 37: “There is no candidate more aligned with what our members believe in and stand for. The soul of our city is at stake. We need a mayor who understands the plight of the essential workers who kept this city running and the struggles working people face. That’s Eric.”

There’s no way to overstate the importance of support from unions like Garrido’s. Not only will many of his members take a cue from him, but so will voters who back unions and watch their endorsements carefully.

Uniformed Fire Officers Association President Jake Lemonda: “Like The Post, the Uniformed Fire Officers Association believes Eric Adams is the right choice to lead the city out of these trying times because he offers the best chance of solving the issues bedeviling the entire city.”

Lemonda’s statement can help drum up support for Adams among the uniformed rank and file in the city. Adams’ service as a police officer will likewise help.

Sheikh Musa Drammeh, head of the National Community Peace Building Commission: “Eric Adams is uniquely qualified and positioned to move the city out of its multi-prong socioeconomic challenges. Despite being knocked down by the pandemic, Adams will bring it back to a new and higher level. He personally understands what poor New Yorkers are going through while also appreciating the contributions of wealthy New Yorkers to our economy. New York knows that Eric Adams is the right leader we need now.”

Sheikh Drammeh has led various efforts forging ties between Jews and Muslims as well as improving police-community relations.

David Gold, a consultant and former Wall Street banker: “Eric believes in New York and its future. Wall Street likes him because he is a man with a plan who sticks to it and cares about our city. We need to feel safe on the street, in the subway, in all of our boroughs, and importantly, people should be comfortable coming to New York. We need Eric Adams because New York is at a critical point — our next mayor will be instrumental in making sure we thrive. That should be Eric Adams.”

Gold knows Adams through his work supporting first-responders as well as widows and children of those who have died in the line of duty. His support may signal to Wall Streeters that Adams is no left-wing radical who’ll let the city fall to ruin and force the financial industry to flee.

Jenny Sedlis, who has headed the pro-charter-school advocacy group StudentsFirstNY: “We’re at a moment in public education where we can’t afford to take good ideas off the table. Eric Adams is not beholden to ways of doing things just because it’s how they’ve been done before; he’s committed to putting the needs of students front and center. New York City needs a mayor like Eric Adams who will fight for every student to have access to excellence and opportunity, no matter their zip code.”

Sedlis is fundraising for Strong Leadership NYC, a pro-Adams independent expenditure committee. Her decision to back him will strike a note with parents throughout the city who care about getting a good education for their kids but can’t afford private school.

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