Connect with us

Fashion

37 Best Makeup Brushes for 2020

Published

on

makeup brushes

Cindy Ord

Every makeup lover has to start somewhere to build their collection. Foundation? Check. Neutral eyeshadow palette? We all begged for Urban Decay’s Naked three palette. Eyeliner? It depends—are you a winged or classic tightline kind of person? But no makeup collection—or look, really—is complete without a handy batch of reliable tools. Figuring out what types of makeup brushes to have on hand can be overwhelming, especially with all of the different options out there. Do you splurge on a professional set or work your way up to becoming an expert using frugal finds?

To help sort things out, we decided to turn to the makeup pros to get tips on which brushes are a must for your kit. There are brushes for literally every part of your face, so there is no need to use your fingers to smudge your eyeliner or lipstick. Shop the best makeup brushes below, from Mac Cosmetic classics to must-have sets you can grab from your nearest Ulta.

Advertisement – Continue Reading Below

Basic Eyes Kit

Sigma Beauty
nordstrom.com

$77.00

My favorite makeup brushes are Sigma makeup brushes because they’re are vegan and they’ve always been a head of the curve in developing amazing brushes for artist,” says Ashunta Sheriff, the go-to makeup artist for actress Taraji P. Henson.

Eyeliner Brush N° 24

Sabrina Bedrani, whose brushes have touched the faces of Gal Gadot, Michelle Williams, and plenty of Hollywood’s finest, says the star of her makeup brush collection is the Dior Backstage Eyeliner Brush #24.  “This brush is perfect for smudging pencil eyeliner onto the lash line, as well as tracing the perfect eyeliner,” she says. Plus, the brush’s sharp edge creates polished and clean lines “by just dabbing the shadow along the lash line, especially when wet.”

Maestro Angled Eye Brush

Giorgio Armani
nordstrom.com

$38.00

If you haven’t quite mastered the smokey eye, Armani Beauty Artistry Collective Member Melanie Inglessis says it could be because you don’t have the Giorgio Armani Blender Brush in your arsenal. “This brush is great for the crease and blending the outer corner of the eyes, especially for smoky eyes,” she explains. 

Maestro Blender Brush

Giorgio Armani
nordstrom.com

$64.00

“This is my favorite foundation brush, it’s short and dense and allows the foundation to be applied without any streaks,” Inglessis adds. 

212 Flat Definer

Mac Cosmetics
nordstrom.com

$25.00

According to Sean Harris, makeup artist to It girls like Laura Harrier, Lori Harvey, and Kristen Noel Crawley—”this brush does it all.” The flat brush “lines your eyes, fills in your brows and adds definition to your eyeshadow.”

All-Over Care Brush

Anisa Beauty
anisabeauty.com

$28.00

“This domed shaped brush is a must for applying all of your favorite skincare products. Applying skincare with a brush will help conserve the amount of product you use considerably,” Harris adds. 

S165 Magic Blending Brush

Cozzette Beauty
cozzettebeauty.com

$20.00

“The S165 by Cozzette is a dome top brush that is really great for concealer application because it’s light and the right size for the under eye,” Raisa Flowers, the makeup magician known for her eccentric eye looks, says. “It is a must-have for makeup artists, especially if you don’t use beauty blenders. I love these brushes because I think skin is so important to your look so having the best tools for skin application makes sense since we not sure to use our fingers anymore for makeup.”

Lock-It Setting Powder Brush

KVD Vegan Beauty
sephora.com

$38.00

Ask Brittany Whitfield to explain why KVD’s powder brush is a good investment and she’ll put it plainly, “If you need one brush for everything, she’s your girl.” Whitfield adds that the brush is amazing for cream products, and “applies incredibly well in all of the beautiful crevices of the face better than any sponge or flat foundation brush ever could.”

Ombre Brush Set

Lottie London
ulta.com

$18.00

As someone who likes to have fun with her makeup looks, Amber Amos likes her tools to match the vibe. But don’t let the pretty pink packaging discourage you. “The synthetic hairs are super soft, and the set takes pretty much covers all your blending needs,” she explains. “Added bonus is inexpensive and super cute.”

118 Blush/Powder Brush

Smith Cosmetics
smithcosmetics.com

$32.50

“For a more luxurious option, Smith Cosmetics makes great brushes. Although they’re pricey, they last long, and blend like a dream. The cute wooden handle is an added bonus,” Amos adds.

No. 14 Powder Brush

Dior
nordstrom.com

$59.00

“I love the round fluffy shape of this brush and also how super the soft the fibers are,” Keita Moore, who does makeup for a number of stars including Iman, Janet Mock, and Halima Aden. “Each stroke feels like luxury. I like to use the brush for applying blush and as an all over finishing powder brush.”

188 Synthetic Small Duo Fibre Face Brush

Mac Cosmetics
maccosmetics.com

$37.00

Moore reaches for this brush a lot. From applying foundations to cream blushes to powder highlight, this brush is versatile and can be used for many things. I carry maybe 3 or 4 in my kit.” 

For Eyeliner

1.21 My Flat Definer

My Kit Co
mykitco.uk

£9.80

Molly R. Stern, who works with Reese Witherspoon, Cara Delevingne, Maya Rudolph, and Julia Roberts says this detailing brush is “amazing” when it comes to precision for eyeliner or brows.

For Buffing

Highlighter Brush Small 140

Make Up For Ever
makeupforever.com

$27.20

This is the best buffer brush, according to Stern: “I use it to smooth under the eye and apply a small amount of powder to control the T-zone.”

For Eyeshadow

Eye Brush #10

Shu Uemura
shuuemura-usa.com

$71.00

Stern says this basic eyeshadow brush from Shu Uemura is “the best for blending and applying eyeshadow and concealer.”

For Contouring

Cheek Brush 06

Tom Ford
tomford.com

$64.00

“I use this for an all-around blending brush after I’ve applied my foundation and contour,” Jessica Elbaum, a makeup artist and hairstylist who currently does hair on Modern Family, says, “you can also use it to apply bronzer.”

For Eyeshadow

Eyeshadow Smudge Brush

Sisley-Paris
bloomingdales.com

$59.00

Elbaum uses this brush to apply eyeshadow. “It’s a perfect gradual angle eyeshadow brush that is almost fool-proof when it comes to applying that perfect, smudgy, eyeshadow fade.”

For Cream Blush

954 Synthetic Brush

Bdellium Tools
bdelliumtools.com

$18.00

“It’s more effective to use a synthetic bristle for cream blushes,” says Elbaum about this slanted kabuki brush. “They blend soft and flawlessly.”

For Lashes

LY53 Eyelash Fan Brush

Louise Young
louiseyoungcosmetics.com

£11.00

“Louise [Young] is a brilliant makeup artist so I was so happy when she brought out this range,” says Nadia Stacey, who did the hair and makeup on The Favourite and won the BAFTA for it. She loves several of Young’s brushes, but specifically calls out the fan brush for period makeup. “Her fan brush LY53 is a thing of beauty, I use it to push color onto the lashes for period pieces when I don’t want it to look like the actors are wearing mascara,” she says.

For the Eye Crease

1.20 My Precise Crease

My Kit Co
mykitco.uk

£12.50

“This is a lovely little blending brush; perfect for softening the crease,” Stacey says. “I use it for creamy concealers for a softer look.”

For Eyeshadow

217S Blending Brush

MAC
bloomingdales.com

$28.00

Stacey calls this a “kit staple” and says she uses it for everything, even to create special effects bruising. “Which means I’ve ruined lots of them, but I always replace,” she says. “Makes a smokey eye so much easier.”

For Foundation

190 Makeup Brush

“MAC brushes have been in my kit since I was a trainee and they are still going strong,” Stacey admits. “I love these foundation brushes. They are big enough to carry a good amount of product, but allow you to be delicate with the application. They never lose bristles, either.”

For Multipurpose

Blush Brush

Real Techniques
ulta.com

$9.99

“I’ve used this Blush Brush since it first came out and I actually use to swirl and buff in cream bronzers, powders, and skin care — not blush at all!” Emma Willis, the makeup artist for JoJo Fletcher, Ashley Greene, Jana Kramer, Audrina Patridge, and Giuliana Rancic says, adding, “That’s the fab thing about brushes; finding which ones works best for your own individual style and technique. What it says on the box doesn’t have to apply at all. I use it to seamlessly buff product from the face into the neck and décolletage areas, too!”

For Highlighter and Touch-Ups

Highlighter Brush

“I absolutely love this fluffy and super-soft, small tapered highlighter brush, which I use for both powder and cream highlighters,” Willis says. “It also works a treat when buffing in cream blush; it’s a fab little precision brush that I also sometimes use for applying loose finishing powder around the t-zone area and under the eyes, and it’s additionally great for touchups and spot checks throughout the day.”

For Concealer

Pro Concealer Brush #71

SEPHORA COLLECTION
sephora.com

$22.00

Willis counts this Sephora Collection brush among her go-tos and says it’s the perfect size. “I’ve been using this brush for concealer around the eye area and T-zone specifically for a long time now and love it!” she says. “It has a tapered brush head and dual usage; one side to place and smooth and other I use to sheer and blend, and it helps me to blend so well!”

For Eyeliner

Flat Eye Liner Brush

Laura Mercier
bloomingdales.com

$28.00

Park recommends this brush for tight-lining with cream, gel, or cake liner. “It’s perfect for stippling on products as close to the lash line as possible,” she says. It also does double-duty to create “sharp edges around the mouth for a clean, perfect lipstick pout.”

For Finishing

M310 Large Soft Fan

Park uses “this brush to dust off any excess powder” and to “strategically place [a] pop of color at the apples of the cheek.” The natural “goat bristles are perfect to create a diffused, natural-looking highlight along the top of the cheekbones, bridge of [the] nose, and collarbone.”

For Powder

BareMinerals Full Flawless Face Brush

“This one is great for loose and pressed powder applications,” says editorial makeup artist Christopher Ardoff. On set, he uses it for touchups because, “it fans out products evenly and flawlessly.”

For Blending

Yachiyo Kabuki Brush

“It is great for blending and diffusing color around the eyes and cheeks,” Ardoff says.

For the Eye Crease

E25 Blending Brush

Sigma Beauty
amazon.com

$14.00

“This brush is great for blending in the crease or socket of the eye,” Ardoff says. It “helps to distribute product densely and evenly” and is “great for softening and blending in areas where you would require a smaller brush.”

For Foundation

Elite Mirror Oval 8 Brush

This foundation brush is a favorite of both makeup artists and their clients. “This is hands down my favorite brush for applying foundation,” says Kaye. “I have never had a client not ask me about this brush because it just buffs in the make up so flawlessly and feels dreamy on the client’s skin.”

For Multipurpose

Dual-Ended Cheek & Contour Brush

If you’re looking for one brush to do it all, this might be it. “This dual, multi-purpose brush is great for blush, bronzer, defining contour,” says Barose. “It’s one of my kit’s favorites.”

Hakuhoda
hakuhodousa.com

$8.00

Kristina also always uses a metal eyelash comb after she applies mascara. “I like a whispie feathery lash and it always helps to take out chucks,” says Kristina. Her go-to choice is this pink eyelash comb by Hakuhoda. 

For Eyeliner

Angled Cut Brush Small 15

Anastasia Beverly Hills
sephora.com

$17.00

Kristina is also obsessed with Anastasia’s Angled Cut Brush’s bristles. “The synthetic hairs keep this brush sturdy and stiff for the most precise lines,” explains Kristina. “I use it to create hair like strokes with powder on brows and also for the sharpest pointed cat eyeliner.” 

For Eyeshadow

217S Blending Brush

MAC
bloomingdales.com

$28.00

The MAC 217 Blending Brush is a staple for Jamie Greenberg, Busy Philipps and Rashida Jones’ makeup artist. According to Greenberg, the brush can turn a novice into a pro in no time. 

For Foundation

Light Coverage Fluid Foundation Brush N11

Dior Backstage
saksfifthavenue.com

$35.00

Dior ambassador Sabrina Bedrani loves this brush because of its ability to apply foundation evenly and smoothly. It’s also a Bella Hadid-approved brush. 

For Eyeshadow

Hood Eyeshadow Brush 13

Utowa
violetgrey.com

$42.00

Nasrat says she has a bunch of these Utowa Hood eyeshadow brushes in her makeup bag.  “The brush is fluffy, flat and with a gradual point,” says Narsa. “It’s perfect for adding eyeshadow onto the lids, contouring into the crease, and great for blending.” She also uses it to set makeup with translucent powder in concentrated areas of the face especially the t-zone. 

This content is created and maintained by a third party, and imported onto this page to help users provide their email addresses. You may be able to find more information about this and similar content at piano.io

Advertisement – Continue Reading Below

Continue Reading
Advertisement
Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Fashion

See How Kim Kardashian Celebrated Chicago’s Birthday, Complete With New Frog Pets

Published

on

chicago west 3rd birthday

Chicago West, Kim Kardashian and Kanye West’s third child, turned 3 years old on Friday, and she celebrated with a lavish party. The toddler’s mom posted photos of her celebration on her story, and truly, the floral decor is on par with some weddings I’ve attended.

Based on the images, Chicago seems to really love two things: the color purple and frogs. There were tables of purple flowers, a stuffed rainbow frog, and…a tank of two frogs apparently named Elsa and Anna.

Kim Kardashian Instagram

chicago west birthday

Kim Kardashian Instagram

chicago west bday

Kim Kardashian Instagram

“My Chi Chi princess 👑 today you are three!!!,” Kardashian wrote in her birthday tribute for Chicago. “You have the sweetest little high voice that I could listen to all day! You bring so much magic into all of our lives. My heart is so full that you chose me to be your mommy ✨ I can’t wait to celebrate you with slime and LOL Dolls today! Happy Birthday Chicago.”

This content is imported from Instagram. You may be able to find the same content in another format, or you may be able to find more information, at their web site.

In recent weeks and months, Kardashian has kept her Instagram focused on her latest work ventures and posts about her kids. But on January 5, Page Six reported that multiple sources had told them that divorce was “imminent” for the couple and parents of four.

“They are keeping it low-key but they are done,” one source said. “Kim has hired [top celebrity divorce attorney] Laura Wasser and they are in settlement talks.”

A source told People this week that this has been coming for a while and said that “the love story between Kim and Kanye has been over for a long time, more than a year. They adored each other but have too many differences.” Another source told the magazine that “Kim and Kanye’s marriage is beyond repair,” though Kim “isn’t in a rush to file for divorce. But it is on her mind.”

This content is created and maintained by a third party, and imported onto this page to help users provide their email addresses. You may be able to find more information about this and similar content at piano.io

Continue Reading

Fashion

Ranking the Best Theories About What’s Happening

Published

on

wanda and vision in wandavision

By the end of 2020, the Marvel Cinematic Universe had started to feel a bit…stale. Part of what makes the superhero genre so universally captivating is its ability to go places that seem too far for other mediums. But by the end of Avengers: Endgame, the MCU was closing the door on a chapter that, no matter how wildly successful, had followed a series of predictable patterns. While that doesn’t make watching Tony Stark save the world any less satisfying, it does make it less nerdy. And no matter how mainstream superheroes get, there’s always a part of the genre that deserves its place in the realm of the nerd, where fan-fueled calculus thrives.

Now, with the explosion of new MCU series rolling out on Disney+ (at least four by the end of 2021), the superhero empire is reigniting fan theory fervor. When WandaVision dropped on January 15, the sitcom-turned-horror-show experiment heralded a bold new path for comic-book narratives. Turns out, superheroes can make for pretty hilarious sitcoms! But, most importantly, WandaVision—at least initially—seems intent on not spoon-feeding fans a story they’ve seen before. Which means, of course, that the fan theory machine is running hot.

WandaVision takes place after Endgame, and it stars Elizabeth Olsen and Paul Bettany as a delightfully well-matched Wanda Maximoff and Vision, basking in newlywed (?) bliss in the quaint 1950s-era suburb of Westview. They don’t exactly know how they got here, or what they’re doing in the 1950s. But they roll with it: befriending neighbors, hosting talent shows, nearly spoiling dinner with Vision’s boss, and trying not to wither under the critical eye of local Karen, Dotty (Emma Caulfied Ford). But increasingly, Wanda has a feeling something isn’t right. She keeps hearing voices on the radio, and at the end of episode 2, she and Vision watch an ominous beekeeper rise from beneath a manhole cover.

New episodes drop every Friday, and as the puzzle pieces come together, we’re gathering the best fan theories from around the internet. Here, we’ll try to make sense of what’s happening to Wanda—and why it matters for the next phase of Marvel stories.

Marvel Studios/Disney+

Theory #1: WandaVision is a spin on the comics arc House of M.

If you’ve spent any time digging around Marvel fan forums, you’ve probably already stumbled on this theory. In 2005, Marvel Comics released a storyline called House of M, written by comics legend Brian Michael Bendis, in which an insane Scarlet Witch (aka Wanda Maximoff) has a mental breakdown and attempts to recreate the universe. You see, she’s lost her two children—Billy and Tommy—as well as her grip on reality. The other Avengers and X-Men (in the comics, Wanda is a mutant) realize they must consider killing Wanda, because her reality-shaping powers pose an enormous threat to humanity if she cannot recover her sanity. Yikes.

Hearing the news of her pending execution, Wanda creates a new world, an almost-perfect utopia where her children are alive, her superhero teammates are happy, and mutants rule the world. But it’s a dangerous lie, and when Wanda realizes what she’s done, she decides the solution is to rid the world of mutants like her. (You might have seen a comic panel circulating of Wanda whispering, “No more mutants.”) At that point, the majority of the mutant population lose their powers.

Marvel

House of M by Brian Michael Bendis

It’s unlikely WandaVision will mirror House of M exactly, because at this point in the MCU, the X-Men and Avengers’ worlds have not yet collided. But it’s certainly possible that Wanda has created an alternate universe out of grief. If you remember the events of Avengers: Infinity War and Endgame, you’ll recall that Wanda is forced to kill Vision while extracting an Infinity Stone from his forehead. He does not return to life in Endgame, and she tells Thanos, “You took everything from me.”

It’s not far-fetched to think Wanda created a new universe after Endgame, one in which she lives a picture-perfect sitcom life with Vision. But perhaps, like in House of M, the real world is not as simple as it seems, and someone is trying to bring her back to her senses.

Theory #2: WandaVision will tie directly into Doctor Strange in The Multiverse of Madness.

This theory is less about if than how. Marvel Studios president Kevin Feige confirmed WandaVision will tie into the film, and Olsen will star alongside Benedict Cumberbatch in March 2022’s The Multiverse of Madness. So, what does that mean? Well, the theory of Wanda creating her own alternate reality within the multiverse is almost definitely true. And if she shows up in the next Doctor Strange, someone must pull her out of the sitcom-verse—and it could be the Master of the Mystical Arts himself.

Theory #3: Agnes is actually Agatha Harkness.

agnes in disney's wandavision

Marvel Studios/Disney+

Here’s one that requires you to know a bit more comic lore. You met Agnes (Kathryn Hahn), Wanda and Vision’s deliciously wry neighbor, in the WandaVision pilot. Sure, she could just be a quippy side-character, but it’s likely she has a more meaningful role in the series.

Several fans think she must be Agatha Harkness; in the comics universe, Harkness is an old (like, was-alive-before-the-sinking-of-Atlantis old) witch who escaped the Salem Witch Trials and went on to master mystical arts, later teaching them to a young Wanda Maximoff. In other points throughout the comics, she serves as Wanda’s antagonist, and she’s also the one who, after Wanda gives birth to twins Billy and Tommy, reveals to Wanda that the children are not, in fact, hers, but were born of more demonic origins. We don’t need to unpack all of that, but the point stands that Agatha has an important role in Wanda’s life—so it makes sense she’d appear in Wanda’s TV show.

Theory #4: The beekeeper is a S.W.O.R.D agent.

You probably noticed a particular symbol that pops up throughout the first two episodes of WandaVision: it appears on the miniature helicopter Wanda discovers in her rosebush, as well as on the suit of the terrifying beekeeper who rises out from the manhole. You could keep waiting for the show to reveal its secret, but most comic fans will recognize that logo immediately: It’s the symbol for S.W.O.R.D, otherwise known as the Sentient World Observation and Response Department. Basically, it’s S.H.I.E.L.D. but for Outer Space.

S.W.O.R.D was created alongside Nick Fury’s S.H.I.E.L.D to deal with extraterrestrial threats, much like the ones that plagued Tony Stark with nightmares after the events of the first Avengers. We know from Captain America: The Winter Soldier that Fury felt the need to up his arsenal after witnessing the many threats hurtling toward our little blue dot, and it’s extremely possible he created S.W.O.R.D sometime around or after Natasha Romanoff released S.H.I.E.L.D’s secrets into the universe.

So, then, who’s the beekeeper? One Reddit fan mentioned it’s likely a S.W.O.R.D agent. Possibly, it’s one wearing a hazmat suit. Once he entered Wanda’s picturesque reality, her mind changed the hazmat suit into a beekeeper’s suit to better fit the quaint suburban surroundings.

Another option? Beekeeper is part of AIM, an organization hell-bent on scientific discovery at all costs. We haven’t seen them since Iron Man 3, but since their goons wear hazmat suits and are sometimes referred to as “beekeeper guys” in the comics, it’s possible.

The other option is that Beekeeper is Swarm, a Marvel villain who fused his consciousness with a bunch of bees. But let’s hope not.

the beekeeper in wandavision

Marvel Studios/Disney+

Theory #5: The series’ big bads are either Mephisto or Nightmare.

Now let’s get deep into the weeds. WandaVision has given us little to no clues as to who its major antagonist will be this season—except for, perhaps, Agatha Harkness. But fans are skeptical Agatha will be the supreme villain. They expect a larger power at work.

The prevailing option seems to be Mephisto. His character has been around since the 1960s, and he’s based on the Mephistopheles of German legend. Basically, he’s a demon-like creature who’s often confused for Satan. He’s evil through and through, and he likes making the Avengers’ lives miserable. One key bit of context: In the comics, he was a servant of Thanos, much like Ronan and other big bads, and he can alter time. So it stands to reason that he’s manipulating Wanda, or that the two of them made some sort of pact—think of it as a deal with the devil. Perhaps, in return for Vision being brought back to life, Wanda agreed to enter Mephisto’s domain, and become trapped in his reality.

Or, we could be on the lookout for Nightmare, one of Doctor Strange’s core villains. He’s a demon and a ruler of the so-called Dream Dimension, where humans are brought during their hours sleeping. He feeds off the human need to dream and can, to some degree, control them through their subconscious. One clever Reddit user developed an entire theory around Nightmare’s inclusion in WandaVision. We’ll summarize it here:

  • Agatha Harkness is alive in the “real” world (aka, Earth-199999), but her child has recently died.
  • Nightmare has lost much of his powers due to the “snap” in Infinity War erasing much of humanity’s population.
  • Agatha promises to help keep Nightmare alive if he helps her get her son back.
  • Agatha meets a grieving Wanda after Endgame and, with the help of Nightmare, sends her into a dream world where she can live with Vision in peace.
  • Even with much of humanity restored, Nightmare isn’t strong enough to keep cracks from showing in his dream world, and that’s why Wanda gets the sense something isn’t right.
  • In the real world, Wanda is producing “energy surges” that spell trouble for the universe, so Nick Fury and S.W.O.R.D attempt to penetrate her mind to pull her out of the dream.
  • When they do pull her out, she’s so grief-stricken and enraged that she tears a hole in the fabric of reality, leading to the events of Doctor Strange in the Multiverse of Madness.

    Theory #6: The folks in the WandaVision commercials are Wanda’s parents.

    Let’s tackle those fascinating commercials, shall we? Each promises a different Marvel Easter egg, and already, fans are dissecting screenshots for clues.

    In both “commercials” during episodes 1 and 2, a couple appear and advertise different products: The first is a Stark Industries toaster and the second is a Strücker watch. If you’re an avid MCU fan, you’ll of course know Stark Industries is Tony Stark’s company, and Strücker is the last name of Baron von Strücker, the Hydra leader who recruited Wanda and her brother Pietro before Age of Ultron and gave them their powers.

    Why is this significant? As one fan pointed out, the ads seem to be revisiting Wanda’s trauma: A Stark Industries bomb killed her parents, and Strücker corrupted Wanda and her brother.

    But who are the man and woman in the commercial? One Twitter user suggested they could be Wanda and Pietro’s deceased parents, alive again either in her memory or her dream universe.

    the man and woman in the commercials in wandavision

    Marvel Studios/Disney+

    Theory #7: Wanda and Vision’s children could pave the way for Young Avengers.

    At the end of episode 2, it’s revealed Wanda is pregnant, seemingly as if by magic, and we know from previously released trailers that she gives birth to twins. These are almost definitely her twins from the comics, Billy and Tommy Maximoff, who have superpowers similar to Wanda and Pietro’s—hex abilities and super-speed.

    Billy and Tommy are stupendous characters in their own right, and they eventually become leaders of the Young Avengers, another popular franchise that Marvel might have plans to cinema-tize. But they also have complicated origins: They’re actually created from fragments of a demon’s soul, and that realization is part of what originally drives Wanda insane during House of M.

    So what if some larger power wants Wanda to have children—and for those children to have something evil lurking within them? A Reddit fan mentioned how ominous it was for the denizens of Westview to repeat “for the children” prior to the talent show. Maybe Mephisto or Nightmare have crafted a sort of “incubator” for super-powered mutants. The MCU has done crazier things before.

    wanda and vision with wanda displaying her pregnant belly in wandavision

    Marvel Studios/Disney+

    Theory #8: Wanda will create mutant-kind.

    How about we go even bigger and bolder? If we know anything about the MCU, it’s that the creators aren’t afraid of ambitious storylines. Plus, more franchises = more $. And the X-Men franchise is a money-maker.

    Disney owns the rights to X-Men, which is why you’ll see those films on your Disney+ queue. So it’s probably not absurd to assume the Avengers MCU and the X-Men universe will eventually collide on the silver screen, as they do in the comics. WandaVision could be what makes that happen.

    One Reddit fan suggested that, after Wanda escapes from her sitcom reality and realizes Vision and her children aren’t real, she might have the ultimate mental break—one that results in the creation of mutants like her, spawning a bridge between her universe and the world of X-Men. Maybe it’s a stretch. But let’s just say I wouldn’t be surprised.

    This story will be updated each week after new episodes of WandaVision drop.

    This content is created and maintained by a third party, and imported onto this page to help users provide their email addresses. You may be able to find more information about this and similar content at piano.io

Continue Reading

Fashion

Julia Rothman and Shaina Feinberg on Their New Book Every Body

Published

on

Julia Rothman and Shaina Feinberg on Their New Book Every Body

Every Body, a new book from illustrator Julia Rothman and writer and filmmaker Shaina Feinberg, is an inclusive, awkward, tender, silly, discomfiting, emotional, and, above all, candid collection about what it means to be a living person. Vignettes about sexual experiences—culled from impromptu on-the-street interviews and anonymous online submissions—are paired with a range of personal essays, discussions with experts, and erotically-charged art. The book addresses a wide range of experiences, from being horny to unlearning religious inhibitions to drunk sex to watching porn to enduring a miscarriage, all while demystifying stigmas and clichés, normalizing uncertainty, acknowledging trauma, and celebrating desire and playfulness.

Rothman and Feinberg, who have a New York Times column about money called Scratch, are also close friends. ELLE.com Zoomed with the duo to discuss creative collaboration, being a good listener, and how people are waaaaay coyer about money than sex.

How did you meet and start working as a duo?

Every Body: An Honest and Open Look at Sex from Every Angle

Rothman: A friend of ours was filming a video and I met Shaina there. I was kinda shy, and Shaina came up to me and said, “Hey! How’s it going?”

[Both laugh]

Feinberg: I saw Julia and I could tell…she felt very New York-y to me, so I was like ‘Oh! Let me strike up a convo.’

Rothman: I ran into you a few times and then invited you to a party. And then—she asked me to do a drawing for one of her films. We started doing more projects together. Shaina wanted to do this thing about how there were no women directors nominated for Academy Awards one year, so I illustrated the piece and she wrote it. And we’re like, ‘Hey, let’s do more of that!’ We did another one for Cup of Jo, and then I was approached by the New York Times to do a column. I was like, I’m going bring Shaina on with me. We like to say the column is basically about small businesses and big personalities.

Feinberg: We were already working on Every Body at that point.

Rothman: That’s true—I brought her on to help me with the book before the Times.

Feinberg: We started the book in April [2019], but the Times didn’t start until August. I think that’s part of why it made sense—we’d already been working so much in concert, as they say.

Rothman: I needed someone who could help me organize and edit. Shaina can come up with crazy ideas I would never do; she has a different brain than I do. I had made a website that I was using to collect stories for the book. I felt the stories were all coming from one type of person: a white woman around my age. I told Shaina I wanted stories from more people and she was like, “Let’s just go on the street and talk to people.” I would never have done that on my own, or even thought of it. That really changed the entire project, which was wonderful. We did it in New York and went to New Orleans and collected a lot of stories.

Feinberg: For Scratch, we were going on the streets and asking people how much debt they’re in. It was similar, going to ask people about sex.

Rothman: People were more scared to talk about debt than they were to talk about sex.

Feinberg: Way more.

Rothman: People did not want to say how much they owed, but they were like, “Let me tell you about my threesome.”

Did you have ideas about what you wanted to cover, or did the conversations and encounters shape the book?

atieh sohrabi

An illustration by Atieh Sohrabi.

Courtesy

Rothman: The stories informed the topics. There were stories we heard that made us realize, we didn’t think of that. We had made a list of everything we wanted to cover, but then there were things like pegging—we didn’t think a bunch of men would tell us they wanted to do that.

Feinberg: We checked off so many things we wanted to get but were just not hearing about certain things, so we were like, we have to make sure to ask people about this.

Rothman: Like menopause. We actively looked to talk about that, because nobody was offering that information. We had to target talking to some older people.

Feinberg: When older women would talk to us, it was more about memories, like when they had sex in 1971. So when we talked to them, we would ask pointedly, “Have you gone through menopause? What was that like?”

Rothman: The most common thing people wanted to tell us about was sexual assault. So many people couldn’t wait to tell us what had happened to them, which was really hard. Also vaginismus, which is when your vagina tightens involuntarily and nothing can go up and people don’t know why it’s happening to them. And women still being virgins when they’re in their 30s and 40s. It felt like an overwhelming number of stories on those three topics.

I imagine you had a copious amount of material. How did you narrow it down?

Feinberg: We went through it a million times. The first time, it was almost all yeses. The noes would be like, “This makes no sense, actually.” We had to say “maybe” to some of them.

Rothman: Ultimately, it came down to getting a diverse group of people. We took statistics. It was anonymous, but we asked about ethnicity, religion, etc. on the website. If we had five stories about vaginismus, and four women were 40 and white and one was 20 and Black, we made sure [the latter] was in there, and that it was a good story—it was weighing all those things.

How did you balance the anonymous narratives with the writers and illustrators you purposefully assembled?

an illustration by eleni koumi

An illustration by Eleni Koumi.

Courtesy

Feinberg: With the essays and interviews, we made a dream list. Like when you’re making a book about sex, you want to talk to Betty Dodson. She just passed, but she was an amazing sex educator for generations.

Rothman: We wanted some funny people and some serious experts. We wanted some sex workers. One guy uploaded his experience onto the website and it was so good, we decided to pay him as an essayist instead of considering him an anonymous anecdote.

Feinberg: Some of it was, we want that writer or interview; some of it was, we want that topic.

Rothman: I’ve done a lot of books and organized and curated lots of illustrated compendiums. For this, I looked at art that had already been done that was sex-related and asked to reuse it for a fee. The art doesn’t relate to the stories. The stories are separate and the illustrations are their own voices.

Feinberg: That’s what it feels like when you flip through and see the illustration “Pardon my hard-on.”

Rothman: I was inspired by how the New Yorker does their spot illustrations. They tell their own story. I reached out to friends, which is the best, and new people to me. Instagram makes it feel like everyone’s so close to each other. But I was, again, looking for a diversity of styles and backgrounds—making sure it had a range.

In addition to statistical diversity, you mention needing tonal diversity in the book—that you had to fish for more positive stories because negative stories were so recurrent.

Rothman: There were so many sexual assault stories. It was draining. I remember when I first read some on the website and cried. I was so upset and not able to sleep. There were some where I was like, I want to reach out to this person and say something but I can’t, but I’m feeling all these feelings about it. I want to say, “Sorry, and it’s okay, and I hear you and I see you.” There was nothing I could do—it’s someone submitting a story to a site. On the street, when people would talk about a terrible thing, we would ask, “Do you also have a good thing that’s happened?” or, “What do you like about your body?”

From the sheer cumulation of stories, did you see patterns emerge? Did you arrive at any sociological or anthropological conclusions?

Rothman: I came away with: Everyone feels alone and like they are weird and different from everyone else. But they’re not.

Feinberg: There’s an interview with Eric Garrison, who’s a forensic sexologist, and he says basically everyone has one question: “Am I normal?” He tries to reframe it as, “Everything is natural and on a spectrum.” What we came away with is, people genuinely wanted to know if what they feel is okay. And yeah, it is.

Rothman: We’re not doctors, and we’re not experts, we’re not therapists. We’re trying not to have judgment. I remember once by NYU, a young woman sat and told me, “I don’t know who I’m attracted to; I can’t tell if I like men or women, and I’ve never had an orgasm.” I can’t say, like, “That’s okay!” I just listened, you know? But I want to say: “That’s okay! Maybe you need to do some exploring on your own and touch yourself.” It was really hard. If you want something overarching: “Everybody is struggling.”

Feinberg: I think everyone is questioning. Everyone is curious. We weren’t giving advice. But my general take from the whole thing was that everyone is struggling—the person next to you or across from you. We all have these bodies, and we’re doing stuff to them.

Rothman: We’re all trying to understand our relationship to them.

an illustration by jasjyot singh hans

An illustration by Jasjyot Singh Hans.

Courtesy

Aside from finding enormous amounts of empathy, has this project pushed you in any new direction, whether it’s your own personal reflection or how you will tackle future projects?

Rothman: I feel like I have yet to find out how this project affected me personally. In terms of work, I realized how much I like talking to strangers. Doing the Times column—it’s my very favorite thing to do, ever. There’s definitely going to be more of that: talking to people and listening to what they have to say, all kinds of people that are really different from us. It feels exciting. It’s like an addiction. I can’t wait until we do it again.

Feinberg: For me personally, I have struggled with body dysmorphia since I was in sixth grade, and working on this book definitely helped me. I felt like I was privy to so many people’s relationships with their bodies. And seeing and hearing about so many kinds of bodies helped me rethink and see that we’re all just bodies, and it’s cool.

Shaina, you discuss this in the conclusion.

Feinberg: It’s so easy, especially as neurotic [slips into accent] “New Yawkahs,” to get out of your body and just be in your brain. This book really helped me to be like, “Oh yeah, I have boobs—let me love them!” Or whatever.

Rothman: We spoke with somebody who had breast cancer, somebody who has a colostomy bag…there’s so many things people are dealing with.

At the start of each section of the book, there are snippets of dialogue between the two of you. How did those come about?

Rothman: Our voice is just to talk back and forth. So we asked each other, “What would you say?”

Feinberg: Some of it was natural. But also I was like, is this too silly for words?

It was grounding! Amongst all these disparate stores, the reader comes back to you as the trusted guides. And you feel the friendship too, which is so endearing.

Rothman: When we met, we were, like, [claps]: done. It wasn’t like, “will we be friends?” It was like: ‘we’re friends.’ It’s a New York Jewish thing. We’re familiar with each other.

Feinberg: It was so easy. With gathering sex stories, there’s a lot of emotion we’ve shared. With Scratch, there’s a lot of things that are—

Rothman: —stressful. Deadlines…

Feinberg: …or someone who shows us their gun in their pants when we’re interviewing them! Like, we were fine, but still, you’re like: let’s wrap this up!

Rothman: [Laughs] We’ve experienced a lot of things together.

Feinberg: And we’ve spent a lot of time together. There’s no TMI anymore, you know?

This content is created and maintained by a third party, and imported onto this page to help users provide their email addresses. You may be able to find more information about this and similar content at piano.io

Continue Reading

Trending