Connect with us

Autos

2021 Ford Ranger Tremor is a winter fun machine

Published

on

2021 Ford Ranger Tremor

I don’t think Ford planned it this way. It’s an 18-degree February morning and we’re on the tail end of a winter storm that dumped a few inches of ice and snow on the Holly Oaks ORV Park in Holly, Michigan. A layer of ice lurks beneath a layer of snow that makes off-roading in the 2021 Ford Ranger Tremor an especially challenging test for truck and driver alike.

The first truck slides backward down the second steep hill a few times before getting enough speed to make it to the top. I’m next. The first hill is a 15-degree grade and the second varies from 18-20 degrees at its base and crescendos to a 30-degree nail-biter at the top. Worse yet, the trail turns off to the right at the top, so I need enough speed to climb the hill but not so much that I go tumbling down the other side once I get there.

2021 Ford Ranger Tremor

We’re on snow in a gravel pit that used to be a rock quarry, so I opt for the Grass, Gravel, Snow setting, put it in 4Hi and lock the rear axle, then gun it. The LT265/70R17 General Grabber A/TX all-season tires grip the snow well enough to build up 25 mph of momentum in a short distance. The Velocity Blue pickup shoots right up the hill. I let off at the top. These high hills would be challenging in summer. Now they’re treacherous.

The Grabbers maintain enough traction that the descent isn’t a slide, and I punch it again shortly before the bottom for the push up the next hill. The tires dig in again and the truck carries enough momentum to get me to the top, but I still have enough control to make the turn. Success.

2021 Ford Ranger Tremor

2021 Ford Ranger Tremor

2021 Ford Ranger Tremor

2021 Ford Ranger Tremor

2021 Ford Ranger Tremor

2021 Ford Ranger Tremor

Halfway there

Ford engineers put a lot of effort into making this possible. They created the Ranger Tremor package as a sort of half step to a Ranger Raptor. It’s $4,290 worth of suspension and styling goodies that improve the off-road prowess without losing any of the 7,500 pounds of towing and 1,430 pounds of hauling capability.

Most of the changes are mechanical. Ford swaps in a set of Fox monotube dampers with piggyback reserves at the rear. They’re not as aggressive as the Fox internal bypass shocks in the F-150 Raptor, but they were chosen for their high displacement, high velocity, and longer travel. The rears have a more robust monotube design while the shocks from Ford’s base off-road package, FX4, have a twin-tube design. The Fox shocks can handle high shaft speeds, and they have more thermal capacity for the constant motion of off-roading.

2021 Ford Ranger equipped with Tremor Off-Road Package

2021 Ford Ranger equipped with Tremor Off-Road Package

The whole suspension is tuned for off-roading, with reduced coil spring rates up front, and softer leaf springs in the rear. The rears change from a single- to a multi-leaf design that allows for about an inch more travel and more ability to withstand off-road pounding. The front stabilizer bar is 1 mm thinner to be more compliant as well. Together, these changes create a softer suspension that can keep in contact with the surface longer and add to on-road comfort.

2021 Ford Ranger Tremor

2021 Ford Ranger Tremor

2021 Ford Ranger Tremor

2021 Ford Ranger Tremor

2021 Ford Ranger Tremor

2021 Ford Ranger Tremor

Ice cross

The more robust suspension comes into play during the next exercise, which amounts to an off-road rallycross course complete with banked turns, short hills, sharp dips, and plenty of snow and ice.

I take a run with the same terrain and powertrain settings I used before and the truck handles it all quite well. Then it dawns on me that Sand mode should act like an off-road Sport mode in these conditions thanks to a more aggressive throttle. I switch to Sand, keep the rear diff locked, and run through the gauntlet again, this time driving like the run is timed.

The greater speeds put more stress on the suspension. The ruts cause sharper impacts and more compression, the approach and departure angles are more stressed, and the tires have to dig harder for traction.

Ford has answers to these issues. The company’s Australian engineers modified the rear jounce bumpers to increase linear travel before the bump stops add to the stiffness of the springs. They set the Ranger Tremor 9.7 inches off the ground, 0.8 inch higher than a Ranger FX4, and added 0.24 inch more front suspension travel and 1.2 inches more travel in the rear. These changes improved the approach, breakover, and departure angles from 28.7, 21.2, and 25.4 degrees for a standard Ranger with 4WD to 30.9, 24.2, and 25.5 degrees, respectively. Finally, the Ranger team chose those General Grappler tires for the balance of on- and off-road capabilities.

As I rail around the course, those changes ensure that the Tremor doesn’t crash against its bump stops, the bash plate doesn’t get bashed, the underside has enough clearance over the dips and swells, and the tires provide as much speed as I’m willing to feed them.

Playing in the snow like this is about as much fun as you can have off-roading, and it’s a good reason to spend the money on the Tremor package. If you haven’t kicked out the tail, charged up and down hills, and bounced over undulations in the snow, you don’t know how much fun winter off-roading can be. It makes the Ranger Tremor a winter fun machine. 

The Tremor also comes with the equipment from the $1,295 FX4 off-road package, which includes the terrain modes, Trail Control off-road cruise control, the electronic locking rear differential, front tow hooks, a steel front bash plate, an off-road screen in the instrument cluster, and skid plates for the radiator, power steering, transfer case, and fuel tank.

On top of that, Tremor includes some exterior cues, like side hoop steps, two rear tow hooks, and Magnetic paint on the grille (with red accents), bumpers, wheels, and 1-inch wider wheel lip moldings. Buyers can also choose optional body side and tailgate graphics that seem like they were born in the 1990s.

2021 Ford Ranger equipped with Tremor Off-Road Package

2021 Ford Ranger equipped with Tremor Off-Road Package

2021 Ford Ranger equipped with Tremor Off-Road Package

2021 Ford Ranger equipped with Tremor Off-Road Package

2021 Ford Ranger equipped with Tremor Off-Road Package

2021 Ford Ranger equipped with Tremor Off-Road Package

My drive home in the Ranger Tremor isn’t nearly as hairy as my trip to Holly Oaks in the snowstorm. On freeways packed with snow and ice, those General Grapplers prove knobby enough to provide excellent snow traction, but they don’t howl at speed like you might expect.

My 14-hour drive there and back again (we’re dedicated here at Motor Authority) also gives me the chance to notice the Tremor’s interior enhancements. It features black interior trim that’s simply dark plastic, all-weather floor mats that get a workout, and cloth Ebony seats (leather in the Lariat) with Miko suede and “Tremor” stitching. The seats are appealing to the eye, but too flat to appeal to the back. Ford also adds a 6-switch auxiliary power plate so owners can add accessories like lights, a winch, a compressor, or a refrigeration unit. My fear that I’ll need a winch during the storm goes, thankfully, unrealized.

Ford offers the $4,290 Tremor package for the XLT and Lariat models with four-wheel drive, a crew cab, and a 5-foot bed. It also requires buyers choose the $1,670 301A appearance package, which adds an auto-dimming rearview mirror, rear park assist, a leather-wrapped steering wheel and shifter, and a 110-volt power outlet. All told, it adds $5,960 to the XLT for a total of $41,900. Lariat buyers have to add the $2,005 501A package to bring the price to $46,275.

For that money, buyers get an off-road Ranger with the chops to conquer steep, snowy hills and take on the likes of the Chevrolet Colorado ZR2 and Toyota Tacoma TRD Pro, both of which costs thousands more. It might be a half step toward a Ranger Raptor, but the Tremor package is a fun off-roader in its own right.

Ford provided a 2021 Ranger Tremor loaner and a night in a hotel for Internet Brands Automotive to bring you this first-hand report. The weather was nature’s bright idea.

Continue Reading
Advertisement
Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Autos

Gunther Werks Speedster, Gordon Murray T.50s, 2022 Mercedes-Benz C-Class: This Week’s Top Photos

Published

on

By

2022 Hyundai Ioniq 5

California’s Gunther Werks returned this week with another carbon-bodied stunner based on the 993-generation 911. This time the company delivered a wide-body speedster to complement its coupe from a few years back.

2022 Hyundai Ioniq 5

The first model based on Hyundai Motor Group’s E-GMP dedicated electric-vehicle platform was revealed this week in the form of the 2022 Hyundai Ioniq 5. The vehicle is a handsome crossover coming to dealerships this fall as a challenger to the Tesla Model Y and Volkswagen ID.4.

Gordon Murray Automotive T.50s

Gordon Murray Automotive T.50s

Last year Gordon Murray showed off the T.50 supercar as a spiritual successor to the McLaren F1 he designed in the early 1990s. This week he revealed an even more extreme version of the T.50 designed for track use.

2022 Land Rover Defender

2022 Land Rover Defender

Land Rover announced some tweaks being made to the Defender for 2022. Among them is the long-awaited availability of a V-8 powertrain, specifically a 516-hp version of Jaguar Land Rover’s familiar 5.0-liter supercharged mill.

2022 Mercedes-Benz C-Class

2022 Mercedes-Benz C-Class

The redesigned 2022 Mercedes-Benz C-Class was revealed. It’s an impressive sedan (and wagon if you live outside the United States), though sadly there aren’t any 6- or 8-cylinder engine options planned—not even in the high-performance variants from AMG.

Ferrari LaFerrari once owned by Sebastian Vettel - Photo credit: Which Car/Tom Hartley Jnr

Ferrari LaFerrari once owned by Sebastian Vettel – Photo credit: Which Car/Tom Hartley Jnr

Formula One driver Sebastien Vettel accumulated an enviable collection of Ferraris during his career driving for the Italian supercar maker. Now he’s off to Aston Martin, so he’s selling off those fabulous cars. Luckily, Aston Martin makes some desirable cars, too.

Scuderia Cameron Glickenhaus 007 Le Mans Hypercar race car

Scuderia Cameron Glickenhaus 007 Le Mans Hypercar race car

Another hypercar in the headlines this week was the new 007 Le Mans Hypercar racer from Scuderia Cameron Glickenhaus. The new season of the World Endurance Championship is nearly upon us, and the 007 has just made its initial shakedown test ahead of April’s season opener in Portugal.

2023 BMW M2 spy shots - Photo credit: S. Baldauf/SB-Medien

2023 BMW M2 spy shots – Photo credit: S. Baldauf/SB-Medien

And finally, BMW was spotted testing a prototype for its next M2. We currently expect the car to debut in 2022 with a detuned version of the 3.0-liter twin-turbocharged inline-6 borrowed from the M3 and M4.

Continue Reading

Autos

GTO Engineering’s Moderna is like a classic Ferrari built new, and you can now order one

Published

on

By

GTO Engineering's Project Moderna

GTO Engineering, an expert restorer of classic Ferraris based in the United Kingdom, recently tested the waters with its own sports car matching the styling and mechanicals of Ferrari’s 250 GT SWB.

Despite costing about a $1 million, still a bargain compared to the real thing, GTO Engineering’s own 250 GT SWB Revival was successful enough to spawn a successor. That successor is another sports car inspired by a 1960s-era Ferrari, and judging by the teaser sketches the Ferrari in question is none other than the legendary 250 GTO.

However, unlike the 250 GT SWB Revival, which was based on a genuine Ferrari chassis, either from a donor 330 or 365, GTO Engineering’s latest car, code-named Moderna, is being built from the ground up using a custom tubular steel chassis, aluminum sub-frames, and carbon-fiber body panels. It will also feature modern suspension, brakes and electronics to reflect modern touches and reliability.

GTO Engineering’s Project Moderna

GTO Engineering’s targeted weight for the car is less than 2,200 pounds, which should make it extremely quickly considering the company plans to drop a quad-cam V-12 under the hood. The modern engine is being developed in-house by GTO Engineering and will be paired to a manual transmission.

The V-12 used in the 250 GT SWB Revival came in 3.0-, 3.5- and 4.0-liter flavors, all developing over 300 hp.

“We’ve learnt from building the 250 SWB Revival, and working on a range of Ferraris, that a car’s weight and engine are two of the key ingredients to make a good sports car,” Mark Lyon, managing director at GTO Engineering, said in a statement.

GTO Engineering's 250 GT SWB Revival

GTO Engineering’s 250 GT SWB Revival

GTO Engineering is currently building the first prototype chassis and finalizing the design of the body which, like the mechanicals, will feature a mix of modern and classic elements. One of the challenges is ensuring the classic proportions remain, while accommodating modern weight distribution and ergonomic requirements. People today are a little taller than back in the ’60s.

GTO Engineering plans to offer a number of personalization options, including paint and trim, as well as the option to adjust major components like the suspension and transmission. Anyone interested in purchasing one can now place an order.

Interestingly, some of the 250 SWB Revivals that GTO Engineering built went to owners of the original car. With prices now exceeding the $15 million mark, taking an original and driving the heck out of it won’t exactly be stress free.

Continue Reading

Autos

Ring Brothers 1968 Mercury Cougar combines old school style with modern running gear

Published

on

By

Ring Brothers 1968 Mercury Cougar

Wisconsin-based hot rod builders Ring Brothers are known for their resto mods. Mike and Jim Ring specialize in taking old cars and revitalizing them with modern components. Their latest project is a 1968 Mercury Cougar.

The badge may say “Cougar,” but there’s a Coyote under the hood, as in Ford’s 5.0-liter V-8. It produces 460 hp, and drives the rear wheels through a 10-speed automatic transmission from a Ford F-150 Raptor.

The car got a frame-off restoration, with new floor pans and a new transmission tunnel, as well as a new front bumper, grille, and badging. A performance suspension by DSE was installed, as were modern brakes. The Cougar rides on HRE Series C1 C103 forged three-piece alloy wheels and Michelin Pilot Sport tires.

 

Ring Brothers 1968 Mercury Cougar

While some of Ring Brother’s past builds have had flashy paintwork and heavily modified sheetmetal, the Cougar looks largely stock. The main giveaways are the aforementioned forged wheels on the outside, the F-150 shifter on the inside.

Launched in 1967 as a companion to the Ford Mustang, the Cougar never escaped the Ford’s shadow. The Cougar eventually shifted to a platform shared with the Ford Thunderbird, becoming larger and more luxurious in the process, and was then reimagined again as a compact front-wheel-drive coupe. That final generation ended production in 2002, and the Mercury brand followed it into oblivion a few years later.

“We had never done a Cougar before, so this was a fun build,” Mike Ring said in a statement. “I love working with new shapes and coming up with new ideas. Ring Brothers would normally unveil a newly completed car at the annual SEMA aftermarket show in Las Vegas, but that wasn’t possible due to the ongoing coronavirus pandemic. Mike Ring said he hopes the car can be shown to the public soon.

Continue Reading

Trending